Difference between revisions of "Adair v. United States"

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In violation of a federal law of 1898, William Adair, acting for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, dismissed O. B. Coppage because he was a member of a labor union. The Supreme Court declared this law unconstitutional because it violated the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment. Labor unions thereby lost some of their protection.  
 
In violation of a federal law of 1898, William Adair, acting for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, dismissed O. B. Coppage because he was a member of a labor union. The Supreme Court declared this law unconstitutional because it violated the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment. Labor unions thereby lost some of their protection.  
  
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[[Category:United States Law]]
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[[Category:Labor Unions]]
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[[Category:Progressive Era]]

Latest revision as of 01:00, July 13, 2016

Adair v. United States was a 1908 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, 208 U.S. 161 (1908). The Court overturned a federal law that made it illegal for railroads to discriminate against employees because they belonged to labor unions.

In violation of a federal law of 1898, William Adair, acting for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, dismissed O. B. Coppage because he was a member of a labor union. The Supreme Court declared this law unconstitutional because it violated the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment. Labor unions thereby lost some of their protection.