Difference between revisions of "Alexander Hamilton"

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Hamilton, with James Madison and John Jay, authored a collection of 85 articles that known as the ''Federalist Papers''. These artices helped turn popular opinion in favor of ratifying the Constitution, particularly in the important states of New York and Virginia.   
 
Hamilton, with James Madison and John Jay, authored a collection of 85 articles that known as the ''Federalist Papers''. These artices helped turn popular opinion in favor of ratifying the Constitution, particularly in the important states of New York and Virginia.   
  
Perhaps Hamilton's greatest contribution to the success of the [[United States]] occurred turning his tenure as Washington’s [[United States Secretary of the Treasury|Secretary of the Treasury]] from 1789 to 1795.  Hamilton's economic program included a system of tariffs and excise taxes, some of which, as demonstrated by the Whiskey Rebellion, caused a great deal of resentment. While Hamilton disliked taxes, he also realized that they were necessary. He also favored close economic ties with the world’s leading economic power, Great Britain.  In his Report on Manufactures, Hamilton envisioned the United States as a nation that would reply on manufacturing and commerce in order to become a great power.  This (among other things) put him at odds with Thomas Jefferson, who envisoned the United States as an agrarian republic.  
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Perhaps Hamilton's greatest contribution to the success of the [[United States]] occurred during his tenure as Washington’s [[United States Secretary of the Treasury|Secretary of the Treasury]] from 1789 to 1795.  Hamilton's economic program included a system of tariffs and excise taxes, some of which, as demonstrated by the Whiskey Rebellion, caused a great deal of resentment. While Hamilton disliked taxes, he also realized that they were necessary. He also favored close economic ties with the world’s leading economic power, Great Britain.  In his Report on Manufactures, Hamilton envisioned the United States as a nation that would reply on manufacturing and commerce in order to become a great power.  This (among other things) put him at odds with Thomas Jefferson, who envisoned the United States as an agrarian republic.  
  
 
Hamilton's portrait is on the face of the $10 bill.
 
Hamilton's portrait is on the face of the $10 bill.

Revision as of 16:43, 3 May 2007

Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1757 - July 12, 1804) was an influential American politician. Alexander entered the military as a Captain of Artillery in the Continental Army in 1776 and was soon appointed as an aide to General George Washington. Hamilton took part in the battle of Yorktown, and was later thought to have informed General Washington about the Newburgh Conspiracy. Hamilton was also a member of the Continental Congress, New York State assembly, and a member of the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention.

Hamilton, with James Madison and John Jay, authored a collection of 85 articles that known as the Federalist Papers. These artices helped turn popular opinion in favor of ratifying the Constitution, particularly in the important states of New York and Virginia.

Perhaps Hamilton's greatest contribution to the success of the United States occurred during his tenure as Washington’s Secretary of the Treasury from 1789 to 1795. Hamilton's economic program included a system of tariffs and excise taxes, some of which, as demonstrated by the Whiskey Rebellion, caused a great deal of resentment. While Hamilton disliked taxes, he also realized that they were necessary. He also favored close economic ties with the world’s leading economic power, Great Britain. In his Report on Manufactures, Hamilton envisioned the United States as a nation that would reply on manufacturing and commerce in order to become a great power. This (among other things) put him at odds with Thomas Jefferson, who envisoned the United States as an agrarian republic.

Hamilton's portrait is on the face of the $10 bill.

Death

Hamilton was wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr, dying of a gunshot wound the following day. [1]

References

  1. Biography

Joseph Ellis, Founding Brothers (New York: Vintage, 2000).

Ron Chernow, Alexander Hamilton (New York: Penquin, 2005).