Difference between revisions of "Alzheimer's disease and prevention"

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In the [[United States]], dementia and Alzheimer's disease are the #2 cause of death <ref>https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/united-states-life-expectancy UNITED STATES : LIFE EXPECTANCY]</ref> In [[Japan]], which has a longer life expectancy than the United States, dementia and Alzheimers diseases are the #14 cause of death.<ref>[https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/japan-life-expectancy Japan life expectancy]</ref> In 2014, The Washington Post indicated that a new study indicated that Alzheimer's disease was the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States, but this study did not include dementia as well.<ref>[https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/new-study-ranks-alzheimers-as-third-leading-cause-of-death-after-heart-disease-and-cancer/2014/03/05/8097a452-a48a-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html?noredirect=on New study ranks Alzheimer’s as third leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer], ''Washington Post'', 2014</ref>
 
In the [[United States]], dementia and Alzheimer's disease are the #2 cause of death <ref>https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/united-states-life-expectancy UNITED STATES : LIFE EXPECTANCY]</ref> In [[Japan]], which has a longer life expectancy than the United States, dementia and Alzheimers diseases are the #14 cause of death.<ref>[https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/japan-life-expectancy Japan life expectancy]</ref> In 2014, The Washington Post indicated that a new study indicated that Alzheimer's disease was the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States, but this study did not include dementia as well.<ref>[https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/new-study-ranks-alzheimers-as-third-leading-cause-of-death-after-heart-disease-and-cancer/2014/03/05/8097a452-a48a-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html?noredirect=on New study ranks Alzheimer’s as third leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer], ''Washington Post'', 2014</ref>
  
According to Harvard Health Publishing, which is under the [[Harvard University]] Medical School, "There's strong evidence that certain diets — like the Mediterranean diet, the DASH diet, and the MIND diet — can help improve cognitive function."<ref>[Don’t buy into brain health supplements], Harvard Health Publishing</ref> According to the [[Mayo Clinic]], an individual can cut his/her risk of getting Alzheimer's disease through a healthier diet.<ref>[https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-depth/15-simple-diet-tweaks-cut-alzheimers-risk/art-20342112 15 simple diet tweaks that could cut your Alzheimer's risk]</ref> Diet is believed to play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer's disease with fish eating populations getting less Alzheimer's disease and meat/dairy eating populations getting more Alzheimer's disease.<ref>[https://www.awakeningfromalzheimers.com/countries-with-the-lowest-dementia-rates-follow-these-7-food-secrets/ Countries With The Lowest Dementia Rates Follow These 7 Food Secrets]</ref> For example, less than 1% of calorie intake in the USA comes from fish compared with 1.5% in the Mediterranean and 5% in Japan.<ref>[https://www.awakeningfromalzheimers.com/countries-with-the-lowest-dementia-rates-follow-these-7-food-secrets/ Countries With The Lowest Dementia Rates Follow These 7 Food Secrets]</ref>
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According to Harvard Health Publishing, which is under the [[Harvard University]] Medical School, "There's strong evidence that certain diets — like the Mediterranean diet, the DASH diet, and the MIND diet — can help improve cognitive function."<ref>[https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/donrsquot-buy-into-brain-health-supplements Don’t buy into brain health supplements], Harvard Health Publishing</ref> According to the [[Mayo Clinic]], an individual can cut his/her risk of getting Alzheimer's disease through a healthier diet.<ref>[https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/alzheimers-disease/in-depth/15-simple-diet-tweaks-cut-alzheimers-risk/art-20342112 15 simple diet tweaks that could cut your Alzheimer's risk]</ref> Diet is believed to play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer's disease with fish eating populations getting less Alzheimer's disease and meat/dairy eating populations getting more Alzheimer's disease.<ref>[https://www.awakeningfromalzheimers.com/countries-with-the-lowest-dementia-rates-follow-these-7-food-secrets/ Countries With The Lowest Dementia Rates Follow These 7 Food Secrets]</ref> For example, less than 1% of calorie intake in the USA comes from fish compared with 1.5% in the Mediterranean and 5% in Japan.<ref>[https://www.awakeningfromalzheimers.com/countries-with-the-lowest-dementia-rates-follow-these-7-food-secrets/ Countries With The Lowest Dementia Rates Follow These 7 Food Secrets]</ref>
  
 
==Lifelong learning and social engagement==
 
==Lifelong learning and social engagement==

Revision as of 13:27, 25 August 2019

There are a number of suspected causes for Alzheimer's disease.[1] According to the Mayo Clinic, researchers believe for most people suffering from the disease, genetics, lifestyle, gender and environmental factors are possible contributors.[1]

After the age of 65, the chance of developing the disease double every five years. The Mayo Clinic reported that almost fifty percent of those people who are 85 years or older are affected.[2]

Cognitive decline and diet

See also: Cognitive decline and diet

In the United States, dementia and Alzheimer's disease is the #2 cause of death [3] In Japan, which has a longer life expectancy than the United States, dementia and Alzheimers diseases is the #14 cause of death.[4]

According to the British Medical Journal, "The brain’s capacity for memory, reasoning and comprehension skills (cognitive function) can start to deteriorate from age 45, finds research published on bmj.com today."[5] Cognitive decline, dementia and Alzheimer's disease are progressive conditions that happen over time.[6][7][8] In the United Kingdom, dementia and Alzheimer's disease are the second leading cause of death.[9]

According to the National Institute of Aging, "Memory problems are typically one of the first signs of cognitive impairment related to Alzheimer’s disease. Some people with memory problems have a condition called mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In MCI, people have more memory problems than normal for their age, but their symptoms do not interfere with their everyday lives."[10]

In the United States, dementia and Alzheimer's disease are the #2 cause of death [11] In Japan, which has a longer life expectancy than the United States, dementia and Alzheimers diseases are the #14 cause of death.[12] In 2014, The Washington Post indicated that a new study indicated that Alzheimer's disease was the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States, but this study did not include dementia as well.[13]

According to Harvard Health Publishing, which is under the Harvard University Medical School, "There's strong evidence that certain diets — like the Mediterranean diet, the DASH diet, and the MIND diet — can help improve cognitive function."[14] According to the Mayo Clinic, an individual can cut his/her risk of getting Alzheimer's disease through a healthier diet.[15] Diet is believed to play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer's disease with fish eating populations getting less Alzheimer's disease and meat/dairy eating populations getting more Alzheimer's disease.[16] For example, less than 1% of calorie intake in the USA comes from fish compared with 1.5% in the Mediterranean and 5% in Japan.[17]

Lifelong learning and social engagement

The Mayo Clinic states that studies suggest that people who keep mentally and socially active during their lives may decrease their chances of developing Alzheimer's disease. Having a higher education, challenging employment, a mentally-stimulating hobby and an active social life may help reduce the risks. The connection hasn't been explained yet, but it may be because the brain develops more "cell-to-cell connections", thus reducing the impact of Alzheimer's damage.[2]

See also

Recommended books

  • Your Miracle Brain: Dramatic New Scientific Evidence Reveals How You Can Use Food and Supplements To: Maximize Your Brainpower, Boost Your Memory, Lift Your Mood, Improve Your IQ and Creativity, Prevent and Reverse Mental Aging by Jean Carper, Harper Paperbacks, 2001 ISBN 0060183918

External links

Notes