Difference between revisions of "American History Homework One"

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{{HS_American_History}}
 
{{HS_American_History}}
[[American History Lecture One|Lecture]] - [[American_History_Homework_One|Questions]] - [[American History Homework One Answers|Student Answers]]
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[[American History Lecture One|Lecture]] - [[American_History_Homework_One|Questions]] <!--- [[American History Homework One Answers|Student Answers]] -->
  
 
American History Homework One
 
American History Homework One
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For written assignments, this course has two tracks:  Honors and regular.  Students can try the Honors track and then drop back to the regular track later if they like, or answer honors questions for extra credit.
 
For written assignments, this course has two tracks:  Honors and regular.  Students can try the Honors track and then drop back to the regular track later if they like, or answer honors questions for extra credit.
 
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These questions require at most one or a few phrases to answer; you do not need to write complete sentences.  Use www.conservapedia.com if you want to look up any terms you do not understand; you are welcome to edit and improve any entries on Conservapedia.
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These questions require at most one or a few phrases to answer; you do not need to write complete sentences.
 
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The preferred way to submit your answers is by posting them online at:
 
http://www.conservapedia.com/American_History_Homework_One_Answers
 
<br>If submitted online, your answers will be considered for the weekly model answers, and grading will be quicker.  Use only your first name and last initial on the site.  You can establish your own account when registration is open, or you can use a student account and password written on the next page.
 
  
 
'''Answer 6 out of 8 questions below''':
 
'''Answer 6 out of 8 questions below''':

Revision as of 22:06, 4 September 2013

Lecture - Questions

American History Homework One
Instructor: Andy Schlafly

Read the lecture, and then reread parts you could understand better.

For written assignments, this course has two tracks: Honors and regular. Students can try the Honors track and then drop back to the regular track later if they like, or answer honors questions for extra credit.

These questions require at most one or a few phrases to answer; you do not need to write complete sentences.

Answer 6 out of 8 questions below:

1. Which time period or periods in American History do you expect to enjoy studying the most? Why?

2. When do you think Native Americans came here, and was it right for Europeans to settle here afterward?

3. Christopher Columbus: overrated, or not given enough credit? Explain.

4. True or false: the Puritans came to America in order to separate church from state (government). Explain.

5. Why do you think Philadelphia became the most populated city in North America by the mid-1700s, and the second most populated city (after London) in the entire British Empire?

6. Pick one of the questions or topics from the lecture, and explain your view.

7. In what ways did the colonies help build the economic strength of England?

8. Spain settled America before England did. So why is the United States an English-speaking nation, rather than a Spanish speaking one?

Honors Questions (answer any 3)

H1. Learning from the experience of the early settlements and colonies, how might our homeschooling community improve today?

H2. Was it expensive to establish a colony? If so, who paid for it?

H3. Pick out any mystery of your choice prior to or during this period, such as whether "triangular trade" really existed or why the "Lost Colony" failed, and discuss it. Some examples are at:
http://www.conservapedia.com/Essay:Greatest_Mysteries_of_American_History

H4. Identify one or more colonies for which the King of England revoked their charters and retook control over them. Why?

H5. Discuss any of the debate or discussion topics from the lecture.