Difference between revisions of "American Indian Genocide"

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The [[United States]], throughout its history, has repeatedly destroyed numerous [[Native American]] settlements and cultures. Some were directly assaulted by the [[military]], while others, such as the [[Cherokee]] and the [[Nez Perce]], were relocated from their homes to [[reservation]]s. The state of [[Oklahoma]] was originally the territory of the Native Americans, but it too was later taken by the American government. Later in its history, the United States attempted to eliminate the culture of Native Americans by abducting their children and sending them to boarding schools where they were punished for speaking their native language or practicing a native ritual.
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This is a [[liberal]] and anti-[[American]] myth. There was no "[[genocide]]" of American Indians as the term "[[genocide]]" is understood.
  
[[Congress]] has recognized the debt owed to Indian tribes as a result of these horrors, and has sought to pass legislation to protect, or restore, Indian cultural sovereignty.<ref>See, e.g., "The Indian Child Welfare Act," preface, 25 U.S.C. s 1901.</ref>
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What the term misleadingly refers to is fighting between the [[United States]] and [[Native American]] settlements and cultures, and relocation of the [[Cherokee]] and the [[Nez Perce]] from their homes to [[reservation]]s.
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[[Congress]] has recognized a debt owed to Indian tribes and passed legislation to protect, or restore, Indian cultural sovereignty.<ref>See, e.g., "The Indian Child Welfare Act," preface, 25 U.S.C. s 1901.</ref>
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==

Revision as of 02:22, December 7, 2007

This is a liberal and anti-American myth. There was no "genocide" of American Indians as the term "genocide" is understood.

What the term misleadingly refers to is fighting between the United States and Native American settlements and cultures, and relocation of the Cherokee and the Nez Perce from their homes to reservations.

Congress has recognized a debt owed to Indian tribes and passed legislation to protect, or restore, Indian cultural sovereignty.[1]

See Also

Wounded Knee Massacre

References

  1. See, e.g., "The Indian Child Welfare Act," preface, 25 U.S.C. s 1901.