Difference between revisions of "American millennials, irreligion, therapy and pseudoscience"

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(Significant percentage of psychologists having depression and/or suicide ideation)
(Psychology and pseuodoscience)
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The idea of psychology used as a substitute for religion is nothing new. Already in his groundbreaking 1977 book, Psychology as Religion: The Cult of self-Worship, Dr. [[Paul C. Vitz]] offered a stinging critique of the selfism that is central to the most popular psychological schools. The narcissism described by Vitz has reached its apex in the millennial generation, and thoughtful observers will find it unsurprising that many millennials would find psychological therapy to be a natural surrogate for religious faith.<ref>[http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/10/01/report-atheist-millennials-trade-faith-therapy/ ''Report: Atheist Millennials Trade Faith for Therapy''] by Thomas D. Willliams PH.D. ''Breitbart News'', 1 Oct 2016</ref>}}
 
The idea of psychology used as a substitute for religion is nothing new. Already in his groundbreaking 1977 book, Psychology as Religion: The Cult of self-Worship, Dr. [[Paul C. Vitz]] offered a stinging critique of the selfism that is central to the most popular psychological schools. The narcissism described by Vitz has reached its apex in the millennial generation, and thoughtful observers will find it unsurprising that many millennials would find psychological therapy to be a natural surrogate for religious faith.<ref>[http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/10/01/report-atheist-millennials-trade-faith-therapy/ ''Report: Atheist Millennials Trade Faith for Therapy''] by Thomas D. Willliams PH.D. ''Breitbart News'', 1 Oct 2016</ref>}}
=== Psychology and pseuodoscience ===
+
== Psychology and pseuodoscience ==
  
  
 
In 2011, the ''[[New York Times]]'' reported:
 
In 2011, the ''[[New York Times]]'' reported:
 
{{cquote|Also common is a self-serving statistical sloppiness. In an analysis published this year, Dr. Wicherts and Marjan Bakker, also at the University of Amsterdam, searched a random sample of 281 psychology papers for statistical errors. They found that about half of the papers in high-end journals contained some statistical error.<ref name="nytimes" />}}
 
{{cquote|Also common is a self-serving statistical sloppiness. In an analysis published this year, Dr. Wicherts and Marjan Bakker, also at the University of Amsterdam, searched a random sample of 281 psychology papers for statistical errors. They found that about half of the papers in high-end journals contained some statistical error.<ref name="nytimes" />}}
==== Significant percentage of psychologists having depression and/or suicide ideation ====
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=== Significant percentage of psychologists having depression and/or suicide ideation ===
  
 
[[Vox Day|Theodore beale]] reported:
 
[[Vox Day|Theodore beale]] reported:
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There is very little scientific evidence of the benefits of psychology. I read one recent study which showed that neurotic individuals actually stabilize on their own at a higher rate than those who seek therapy. This is no surprise, as the foundations of psychology are literally fiction.<ref>[http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/02/psychologist-heal-thyself.html Psychologist, heal thyself]</ref>}}
 
There is very little scientific evidence of the benefits of psychology. I read one recent study which showed that neurotic individuals actually stabilize on their own at a higher rate than those who seek therapy. This is no surprise, as the foundations of psychology are literally fiction.<ref>[http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/02/psychologist-heal-thyself.html Psychologist, heal thyself]</ref>}}
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=== Psychology and pseuodoscience ===
 
=== Psychology and pseuodoscience ===
  

Revision as of 04:38, 14 March 2017

In 2010, the Pew Research Forum reported concerning the millennial generation:

By some key measures, Americans ages 18 to 29 are considerably less religious than older Americans...

Compared with their elders today, young people are much less likely to affiliate with any religious tradition or to identify themselves as part of a Christian denomination. Fully one-in-four adults under age 30 (25%) are unaffiliated, describing their religion as “atheist,” “agnostic” or “nothing in particular.” This compares with less than one-fifth of people in their 30s (19%), 15% of those in their 40s, 14% of those in their 50s and 10% or less among those 60 and older. About two-thirds of young people (68%) say they are members of a Christian denomination and 43% describe themselves as Protestants, compared with 81% of adults ages 30 and older who associate with Christian faiths and 53% who are Protestants.[1]

Peter Burfeind's article Millennials Are In Election Hell Because Politics Has Become Their God published in The Federalist indicates:

According to progressive faith, the “arc of history” always bends Left. Well, history just spawned Donald Trump, and if European political trends are indicative, this is not an isolated incident. For leftists, this is akin to if Christians woke up to find Jesus’ bones had been discovered. It shattered their faith.

The freak-out is especially acute among millennials. These are the “nones” and the “spiritual but not religious” bunch we’ve heard about the past decade. Millennials, we were told, didn’t abandon faith per se—can the human spirit truly live without faith?—they simply redirected it away from “organized religion” toward other things, chief among which was politics. I wonder how that’s working out for them.

As ridiculous and ubiquitous as the pathetically referenced “stages of grief” has become to explain how they feel about losing an election (!), the depth of leftist grief does magnify the essential religiosity they place on politics. Some reflection is in order.[2]

Thomas D. Willliams PH.D. wrote in his article Report: Atheist Millennials Trade Faith for Therapy:

In the absence of God or religious faith, many millennials are seeking meaning for their lives and an explanation of existence through psychological therapy, a new essay suggests.

Writing for Quartz, self-described atheist millennial Elizabeth King argues that for herself and countless colleagues, “therapy is our new church,” while noting that “many millennials grappling with the big questions in life want to work them out on a psychologist’s couch instead of a church pew.”

“Most of the people I know are in therapy,” she states.

The idea of psychology used as a substitute for religion is nothing new. Already in his groundbreaking 1977 book, Psychology as Religion: The Cult of self-Worship, Dr. Paul C. Vitz offered a stinging critique of the selfism that is central to the most popular psychological schools. The narcissism described by Vitz has reached its apex in the millennial generation, and thoughtful observers will find it unsurprising that many millennials would find psychological therapy to be a natural surrogate for religious faith.[3]

Psychology and pseuodoscience

In 2011, the New York Times reported:

Also common is a self-serving statistical sloppiness. In an analysis published this year, Dr. Wicherts and Marjan Bakker, also at the University of Amsterdam, searched a random sample of 281 psychology papers for statistical errors. They found that about half of the papers in high-end journals contained some statistical error.[4]

Significant percentage of psychologists having depression and/or suicide ideation

Theodore beale reported:

This is why therapy is reliably doomed to failure:..

In addition to the 46 percent of psychologists who the NHS reports as being depressed, "out of 800 psychologists sampled, 29 per cent reported suicidal ideation and 4 per cent reported attempting suicide."...

Would you go to a plumber whose toilet is overflowing? Would you hire a computer programmer who didn't know how to use a computer? Then why would you ever talk to one of these nutjobs in order to fix whatever mental issues you might be having?...

There is very little scientific evidence of the benefits of psychology. I read one recent study which showed that neurotic individuals actually stabilize on their own at a higher rate than those who seek therapy. This is no surprise, as the foundations of psychology are literally fiction.[5]

Psychology and pseuodoscience

In 2011, the New York Times reported:

Also common is a self-serving statistical sloppiness. In an analysis published this year, Dr. Wicherts and Marjan Bakker, also at the University of Amsterdam, searched a random sample of 281 psychology papers for statistical errors. They found that about half of the papers in high-end journals contained some statistical error.[4]

Significant percentage of psychologists having depression and/or suicide ideation

Theodore beale reported:

This is why therapy is reliably doomed to failure:..

In addition to the 46 percent of psychologists who the NHS reports as being depressed, "out of 800 psychologists sampled, 29 per cent reported suicidal ideation and 4 per cent reported attempting suicide."...

Would you go to a plumber whose toilet is overflowing? Would you hire a computer programmer who didn't know how to use a computer? Then why would you ever talk to one of these nutjobs in order to fix whatever mental issues you might be having?...

There is very little scientific evidence of the benefits of psychology. I read one recent study which showed that neurotic individuals actually stabilize on their own at a higher rate than those who seek therapy. This is no surprise, as the foundations of psychology are literally fiction.[6]

  1. Religion among the millenials, Pew Research Center
  2. Millennials Are In Election Hell Because Politics Has Become Their God by Peter Burfeind, The Federalist
  3. Report: Atheist Millennials Trade Faith for Therapy by Thomas D. Willliams PH.D. Breitbart News, 1 Oct 2016
  4. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named nytimes
  5. Psychologist, heal thyself
  6. Psychologist, heal thyself