Difference between revisions of "Anything Goes"

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"'''Anything Goes'''" is the title of a 1934 musical production written by [[Cole Porter]]. Popular songs from the musical, which have become standards, include ''You're the Top,'' ''I Get a Kick Out of You,'' and ''Anything Goes.''  
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"'''Anything Goes'''" is a 1934 musical production written by [[Cole Porter]]. The show contains many Popular songs which have become standards, including: ''You're the Top,'' ''I Get a Kick Out of You,'' and ''Anything Goes.''  
  
A very successful 1987 Broadway revival starred Patti Lupone as Reno Sweeney. The frivolous and problematical book was all-but-rewritten, and the song list beefed up to include famous Porter songs not in the original, including "De-Lovely," "Friendship," and "Easy to Love," as well as some songs Porter wrote while at Yale.
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The show enjoyed a very successful revival in 1987 on Broadway, starring Patti Lupone as Reno Sweeney. The book, which had often been considered frivolous and problematical underwent an almost complete rewrite, and several songs were added or removed to fix some pacing issues. Several famous Porter songs not in the original script, including "De-Lovely," "Friendship," and "Easy to Love," were added, as well as some songs Porter wrote while at Yale.
  
 
[[Category:Music]]
 
[[Category:Music]]

Revision as of 21:38, 15 September 2008

"Anything Goes" is a 1934 musical production written by Cole Porter. The show contains many Popular songs which have become standards, including: You're the Top, I Get a Kick Out of You, and Anything Goes.

The show enjoyed a very successful revival in 1987 on Broadway, starring Patti Lupone as Reno Sweeney. The book, which had often been considered frivolous and problematical underwent an almost complete rewrite, and several songs were added or removed to fix some pacing issues. Several famous Porter songs not in the original script, including "De-Lovely," "Friendship," and "Easy to Love," were added, as well as some songs Porter wrote while at Yale.