Difference between revisions of "Assyrian Empire"

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The Assyrians were known for their cruelty and military skills, and more than a few references in the Bible lament their treatment of the Hebrews. The Old Testament mentions “Assyria” 119 times, including this typical verse: “The Lord was with him; wherever he went, he prospered. He rebelled against the king of Assyria and would not serve him.” (2 Kings 18:7 (NRS))  
 
The Assyrians were known for their cruelty and military skills, and more than a few references in the Bible lament their treatment of the Hebrews. The Old Testament mentions “Assyria” 119 times, including this typical verse: “The Lord was with him; wherever he went, he prospered. He rebelled against the king of Assyria and would not serve him.” (2 Kings 18:7 (NRS))  
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The Assyrians conquered Israel in 722 B.C., but Judea remained free.
  
 
Ultimately, a Chaldean-Median coalition destroyed the Assyrians in 612-609 B.C.
 
Ultimately, a Chaldean-Median coalition destroyed the Assyrians in 612-609 B.C.
  
 
[[Category:History]]
 
[[Category:History]]

Revision as of 10:19, 8 May 2007

Assyria was a very ancient kingdom in northern Mesopotamia. Today that would be in northern Iraq.

It was dependent on Babylonia for a while, but rose to become an independent state in the 14th century B.C. Beginning with the 12th century it declined, only to reemerge as a kingdom again in the 8th century B.C. Under a sequence of powerful Assyrian kings of Tiglath-pileser III, Sargon II, Sennacherib and Esarhaddon, Assyria controlled most of the Middle East from Egypt to the Persian Gulf.

The Assyrians were known for their cruelty and military skills, and more than a few references in the Bible lament their treatment of the Hebrews. The Old Testament mentions “Assyria” 119 times, including this typical verse: “The Lord was with him; wherever he went, he prospered. He rebelled against the king of Assyria and would not serve him.” (2 Kings 18:7 (NRS))

The Assyrians conquered Israel in 722 B.C., but Judea remained free.

Ultimately, a Chaldean-Median coalition destroyed the Assyrians in 612-609 B.C.