Difference between revisions of "Atheistic science"

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== Pretended Completeness of Scientific Understanding ==
 
== Pretended Completeness of Scientific Understanding ==
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[[Isaac Newton]], a devout [[Christian]], knew that man only understood a small fraction of possible knowledge.  But atheistic science pretends, implausibly, that it has a near-completeness of scientific understanding of the world.  Its view is disproven by numerous counterexamples to its theories.
  
 
== Opposition to Action-at-a-Distance ==
 
== Opposition to Action-at-a-Distance ==

Revision as of 19:36, 31 August 2014

Atheistic science is an approach to science that clings to atheistic views of the universe and life, at the complete exclusion of Biblical scientific foreknowledge and non-materialistic phenomena.

An example of atheistic science is the (absurd) insistence that remarkable migration by butterflies and birds can somehow be explained by magnetism.

Uncertainty and entropy

Atheistic science downplays or denies the central role played by uncertainty (quantum mechanics, or chaos) in the physical world. For a half-century, some scientists even refused to accept the truth of quantum mechanics. Overly narrow interpretations of the Second Law of Thermodynamics is another characteristic of atheistic science.

Contradictions

Atheistic science is riddled with self-contradictions. A few examples are:

  • atheistic science denies the existence of the unseen, while simultaneously admitting that the entire universe began from the unseen.

Pretended Completeness of Scientific Understanding

Isaac Newton, a devout Christian, knew that man only understood a small fraction of possible knowledge. But atheistic science pretends, implausibly, that it has a near-completeness of scientific understanding of the world. Its view is disproven by numerous counterexamples to its theories.

Opposition to Action-at-a-Distance