Difference between revisions of "Blitzkrieg"

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A blitzkrieg is a quick surprise attack by massive ground and air forces, usually by the German military.  "Blitzkrieg" is from the German words for lighting ("blitz") and war ("krieg").
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A blitzkrieg is a quick surprise attack by massive ground and air forces.  "Blitzkrieg" is from the German words for lighting ("blitz") and war ("krieg"). High ranking German officers came up with the term to describe their World War 2 strategy, which was used in all the Nazi invasions. The strategy is still used today in quick wars, like the invasion of Iraq in 2004. The war was one between two militaries, but America's superior power, coupled with shock-tactics and speed destroyed teh Iraqi military very quickly, much like the German annhihilation of Polish armed forces in September 1939.
''This term was first coined by the New York Times''
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Revision as of 14:57, 19 March 2007

A blitzkrieg is a quick surprise attack by massive ground and air forces. "Blitzkrieg" is from the German words for lighting ("blitz") and war ("krieg"). High ranking German officers came up with the term to describe their World War 2 strategy, which was used in all the Nazi invasions. The strategy is still used today in quick wars, like the invasion of Iraq in 2004. The war was one between two militaries, but America's superior power, coupled with shock-tactics and speed destroyed teh Iraqi military very quickly, much like the German annhihilation of Polish armed forces in September 1939.