Difference between revisions of "Bodie"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(Undo revision 890062 by JOEMAMA (talk))
(clean up & uniformity)
 
(3 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
[[Image:Bodie07.JPG‎ |350px|thumb|right|Bodie, California]]  
+
[[Image:Bodie07.JPG‎|350px|thumb|right|Bodie, California]]  
  
'''Bodie, California''' is a famous American [[ghost town]].  
+
'''Bodie, California''' is a famous American [[ghost town]]. Located in Mono County, California, in 1962 the remains of the town was designated a California State Historic Park park and a National Historic Site.<ref>http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=509 State of California Parks Dept</ref>
  
  
In 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880. By that time, the town of Bodie bustled with families, robbers, miners, store owners, gunfighters and prostitutes of all kinds. At one time there was reported to be 65 saloons in town. Amongst the saloons were numerous brothels and 'houses of ill repute', gambling halls and opium dens.  
+
In 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880.  
  
  
There are records that say that Wm. Body took a ship from New York, around the horn to end up in San Francisco. The name of the town was changed at some point in time, before the majority of the people made their way to Bodie. There are different stories as to why - one says it was to keep the correct pronunciation of town's namesake. Another says that the sign painter didn't have the room for the tail of the lower-case "y". Today, even though Bodie is lost down a dusty 13 mile long road, off of state highway 395, it is amazing just how many people are aware of this once glorious town.
+
There are records that say that Wm. Body took a ship from New York, around the horn to end up in [[San Francisco]]. The name of the town was changed at some point in time, before the majority of the people made their way to Bodie. There are different stories as to why - one says it was to keep the correct pronunciation of town's namesake. Another says that the sign painter didn't have the room for the tail of the lower-case "y". Today, even though Bodie is lost down a dusty 13 mile long road, off of state highway 395, it is amazing just how many people are aware of this once glorious town.
 
+
 
+
 
+
The State of California they took over the town in 1962 to make it a State Historic Park. <ref>Bodie State Historic Park[http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=509]</ref>
+
  
 +
==See also==
 +
*[[Oregon Caves National Monument]]
 +
*[[Mojave National Preserve]]
 +
*[[Death Valley National Park]]
 +
*[[White Sands National Monument]]
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
 +
<references/>
  
{{reflist}}
+
==External links==
 
+
* [http://www.bodie.com Official Bodie site]
[[Category: American History]]
+
* [http://www.city-data.com/city/Bodie-California.html Bodie, California] on [[City-data.com]]
  
[[Category:California]]
+
[[Category:American History]]
 +
[[Category:California Cities and Towns]]
 +
[[Category:Tourist Attractions]]

Latest revision as of 21:40, 11 July 2016

Bodie, California

Bodie, California is a famous American ghost town. Located in Mono County, California, in 1962 the remains of the town was designated a California State Historic Park park and a National Historic Site.[1]


In 1859 William (a.k.a. Waterman) S. Bodey discovered gold near what is now called Bodie Bluff. A mill was established in 1861 and the town began to grow. It started with about 20 miners and grew to an estimated 10,000 people by 1880.


There are records that say that Wm. Body took a ship from New York, around the horn to end up in San Francisco. The name of the town was changed at some point in time, before the majority of the people made their way to Bodie. There are different stories as to why - one says it was to keep the correct pronunciation of town's namesake. Another says that the sign painter didn't have the room for the tail of the lower-case "y". Today, even though Bodie is lost down a dusty 13 mile long road, off of state highway 395, it is amazing just how many people are aware of this once glorious town.

See also

References

  1. http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=509 State of California Parks Dept

External links