Difference between revisions of "CE"

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The term "Common Era" (CE) is an anti-Christian attempt to conceal that Jesus is the historical basis for the primary calendar dating system.  "Common Era" has no real meaning, and even the origin of this term is unclear. The 1972 Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary has no entry for "Common Era." A later edition (11th) defines it as the Christian Era. The first recorded use of the phrase "common era" was in 1708. <ref> http://books.google.com/books?id=D_wvAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA515&dq=%22common+era%22&lr=lang_en&as_drrb_is=b&as_minm_is=1&as_miny_is=800&as_maxm_is=1&as_maxy_is=1740&as_brr=0&cd=2#v=onepage&q=%22common%20era%22&f=false</ref>
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The term "Common Era" (CE) is an anti-Christian attempt to conceal that Jesus is the historical basis for the primary calendar dating system.  "Common Era" has no real meaning, and even the origin of this term is unclear. A later edition (11th) defines it as the Christian Era. The first recorded use of the phrase "common era" was in 1708. <ref> http://books.google.com/books?id=D_wvAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA515&dq=%22common+era%22&lr=lang_en&as_drrb_is=b&as_minm_is=1&as_miny_is=800&as_maxm_is=1&as_maxy_is=1740&as_brr=0&cd=2#v=onepage&q=%22common%20era%22&f=false</ref>
  
The established calendar dating system is based on the calculations of [[Dionysius Exiguus]] for the birthyear of [[Jesus]] relative to the foundation of Rome<ref>[http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEhelp/calendars.html Index to Calendars, NASA site]. The story is actually more complex, because pagan and murderer Emperor Diocletian had replaced the system that date events from the Foundation of Rome by a system based on himself, but the conversion between the then-called "A.D." (Anno Diocletian) and the foundation of Rome (Anno Urbis Conditae) was just a matter of adding an integer</ref>, and no one disputes that.  But this birth did not begin a "common" era, or any immediate change in history.  The 1997 [[Merriam-Webster]]'s Collegiate Dictionary gives a date of 1889 for the origin of the term "Common Era," but there is no indication  of who began using it then, and why.  Some claim it is a substitute for an occasional reference to the "Vulgar Era," with "vulgar" being Latin for "common" but acquiring a derogatory English meaning over time.
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The established calendar dating system, which uses the 'AD' notation, is based on the calculations of [[Dionysius Exiguus]] for the birthyear of [[Jesus]] relative to the foundation of Rome<ref>[http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEhelp/calendars.html Index to Calendars, NASA site]</ref>. At the time, dates used the 'AD' system instituted by pagan and murderer Emperor Diocletian, which used his own date of birth as year 0. Because Dionysius Exiguus in the year 525 wanted to end the memorialization of an evil man who persecuted Christians, he invented a new numbering system based on his calculations of the birth year of Jesus Christ.  
  
While use of "Common Era" attempts to erase recognition for the Christian basis of the calendar, there are not similar attempts to erase non-Christian religious names from the calendar, such as the days of the week named after Norse gods.  Numerous texts, particularly schoolbooks, have replaced "B.C./A.D." with "Common Era" symbols over the past decade.
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While the use of the phrase "Common Era" has existed for hundreds of years, only recently have [[politically correct|political correctness]] [[liberals]] attempted to replace all instances of 'AD' with 'CE.' The original use of 'CE' was to avoid the common practice of countries basing their dates on the birthdate of one of their rules, i.e. the "regal era" from the birthdate of Jesus Christ, which belonged to all men "the common era." While use of "Common Era" attempts to erase recognition for the Christian basis of the calendar, there are no similar attempts to erase non-Christian religious names from the calendar, such as the days of the week named after Norse gods.  Numerous texts, particularly schoolbooks, have replaced "B.C./A.D." with "Common Era" symbols over the past decade.
 
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Consider this frank question and answer with a rabbi about the use of "Common Era," which illustrates that the term "Common Era" did not come from Judaism:<ref>http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/263/Q3/</ref>
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Dear Rabbi:
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I would like to know why we say "before the Common Era" and "Common Era" (BCE and CE).
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I mean, why do we call it "common?" ...
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Dear Viviane [],
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When I was a school boy I thought that CE stood for "The Common Error."
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Now, 25 years and a number of common errors later, I assume that Common Era simply means "the date commonly accepted and used." '''But the truth is that I don't know, so I asked your question to a professor of European history. He didn't know either.'''
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== Sources ==
 
== Sources ==

Revision as of 15:57, 21 May 2010

The term "Common Era" (CE) is an anti-Christian attempt to conceal that Jesus is the historical basis for the primary calendar dating system. "Common Era" has no real meaning, and even the origin of this term is unclear. A later edition (11th) defines it as the Christian Era. The first recorded use of the phrase "common era" was in 1708. [1]

The established calendar dating system, which uses the 'AD' notation, is based on the calculations of Dionysius Exiguus for the birthyear of Jesus relative to the foundation of Rome[2]. At the time, dates used the 'AD' system instituted by pagan and murderer Emperor Diocletian, which used his own date of birth as year 0. Because Dionysius Exiguus in the year 525 wanted to end the memorialization of an evil man who persecuted Christians, he invented a new numbering system based on his calculations of the birth year of Jesus Christ.

While the use of the phrase "Common Era" has existed for hundreds of years, only recently have political correctness liberals attempted to replace all instances of 'AD' with 'CE.' The original use of 'CE' was to avoid the common practice of countries basing their dates on the birthdate of one of their rules, i.e. the "regal era" from the birthdate of Jesus Christ, which belonged to all men "the common era." While use of "Common Era" attempts to erase recognition for the Christian basis of the calendar, there are no similar attempts to erase non-Christian religious names from the calendar, such as the days of the week named after Norse gods. Numerous texts, particularly schoolbooks, have replaced "B.C./A.D." with "Common Era" symbols over the past decade.

Sources

  1. http://books.google.com/books?id=D_wvAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA2-PA515&dq=%22common+era%22&lr=lang_en&as_drrb_is=b&as_minm_is=1&as_miny_is=800&as_maxm_is=1&as_maxy_is=1740&as_brr=0&cd=2#v=onepage&q=%22common%20era%22&f=false
  2. Index to Calendars, NASA site