Difference between revisions of "Cheese"

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[[Image:Cheese.jpg|thumb|180px|Blue Stilton, a fine traditional English cheese.]]
 
[[Image:Cheese.jpg|thumb|180px|Blue Stilton, a fine traditional English cheese.]]
  
'''Cheese''' is a solidified dairy product made from milk solids, or [[curd]]s, which are first separated from the [[whey]]. Most cheeses are processed by aging, after adding active cultures, either enzymes or fungi, to the curds, although some are not - notably mozzarella, which is best eaten fresh.  Salt is also often an ingredient in cheese recipes.
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'''Cheese''' is a solidified dairy product made from milk solids, or [[curd]]s, which are first separated from the [[whey]]. Most cheeses are processed by [[fermentation]] with [[yeast]] or the addition of [[enzyme]]s to the curds, and then [[aging|aged]], sometimes for many years.  Some are not - notably mozzarella, which is made and best eaten fresh.  Salt is also often an ingredient in cheese recipes.
  
 
==Sources Used to Make Cheese==
 
==Sources Used to Make Cheese==

Revision as of 11:20, 20 April 2007

Blue Stilton, a fine traditional English cheese.

Cheese is a solidified dairy product made from milk solids, or curds, which are first separated from the whey. Most cheeses are processed by fermentation with yeast or the addition of enzymes to the curds, and then aged, sometimes for many years. Some are not - notably mozzarella, which is made and best eaten fresh. Salt is also often an ingredient in cheese recipes.

Sources Used to Make Cheese

Most cheese is made from cow's milk, although technically, any large mammal's milk can be used. Some common sources of milk for making cheese other than cows include:

Cheese History

France is especially renowned as a cheese producer, and their president Charles de Gaulle famously said : "How can a country with 300 different kinds of cheese agree on anything?". However, many French cheeses are made from unpasteurised milk and their transport across international borders is therefore forbidden for health reasons. Certain French cheeses (such as Epoisses) are so smelly that their carriage even on French public transport is also banned.[Citation Needed]

It is most likely that the invention of cheesemaking was a way of preserving excess milk for leaner times.

Varieties

There are literally thousands of varieties of cheese made in the world today, but some are much better known than others:

  • American (a very mild cheddar, processed for a smooth texture)
  • "Blue" cheeses, including Roquefort and Stilton (created by adding special molds to the aging cheese)
  • Brie (a soft, pungent cheese)
  • Camembert (a pungent, very soft cheese)
  • Cheddar (ranging from mild to very sharp, probably the most popular cheese in the world)
  • Feta (crumbly, made from goat's milk)
  • Gouda ("dutch" cheese, firm and nutty)
  • Monterrey Jack
  • Mozzarella (soft and mild, as noted, not aged but made and eaten, ideally, fresh)
  • Muenster
  • Parmesan (hard, and usually grated to serve)
  • Provolone (moderately sharp and rich)
  • Romano (hard, and usually grated)
  • Swiss

Cheese in Culture

In England, the traditional sport of cheese-rolling remains locally popular. [1]

James McIntyre, a Canadian poet, was fond of writing poems and odes to cheese. This is not because he thought the subject was funny, or ironic. Rather, McIntyre saw cheese production in Canada as a symbol of the strong growth in the Canadian economy. Many people today find his works quite humorous, but McIntyre's "Ode on the Mammoth Cheese" is considered by most poetry scholars not only his best work, but his ultimate achievement.

Cheese is considered by some as a palliative for various internal diseases.