Difference between revisions of "Condoleezza Rice"

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'''Condoleezza Rice''' is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the first African-American woman to hold the post. Prior to assuming her duties as Secretary of State, she served as national security advisor to President Georege W. Bush
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'''Condoleezza Rice''' is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the first African-American woman to hold the post. Prior to assuming her duties as Secretary of State, she served as national security advisor to President George W. Bush
  
 
== Earlier Life and Education ==
 
== Earlier Life and Education ==

Revision as of 00:27, 4 May 2007

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Condoleezza Rice is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the first African-American woman to hold the post. Prior to assuming her duties as Secretary of State, she served as national security advisor to President George W. Bush

Earlier Life and Education

Dr. Rice earned her B. A. in political science from the University of Denver in 1974 at age 19. The following year, she recieved her M.A. from the University of Notre Dame. She returned to the University of Denver, where she was awarded the Ph.D. in 1981. In addition to English, she speaks Russian, French, German, and Spanish.

Career In Academia

Condoleeza was first an Assistant Professor at Stanford (1981–1987). She eventually earned tenure, becoming an Associate Professor (1987–1993), then Professor, and later Provost.[1] She was the first black, first woman and the youngest person to be Provost.[2] She was also a Hoover Institute fellow. Her primary expertise was the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact nations.

As Provost, Dr. Rice balanced the budget, even though the deficit was said to be impossibly large, a prediction which Rice happily proved wrong. [3]


Writings

  • Germany Unified and Europe Transformed: A Study in Statecraft (1995)
  • The Gorbachev Era (1986)
  • The Soviet Union and the Czechoslovak Army, 1948-1983: Uncertain Allegiance (1984).

Business

  • Carnegie Corporation
  • Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
  • Charles Schwab Corporation
  • Chevron Corporation
  • Hewlett Packard
  • Rand Corporation
  • Transamerica Corporation
  • William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
  • KQED
  • J.P. Morgan Chase
  • University of Notre Dame
  • San Francisco Symphony
  • Center for New Generation
  • California and East Menlo Park
  • Vice President Boys and Girls Clubs of America of San Francisco
  • National Council for Soviet and East European Studies
  • Stanford Mid-Peninsula Urban Coalition
  • Woodrow Wilson Center

She was very involved with Chevron before becoming George W. Bush's. Chevron honored Rice by naming an oil tanker after her, but this was controversial and as a result the ship was renamed the Altair Voyager.[4]


Career in Joint Chiefs and National Security Council

In 1986, while an international affairs fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations, Rice served as Special Assistant to the Director of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. From 1989 to March 1991 she directed and also directed in a senior position, of Soviet and East European Affairs in the National Security Council. She was also Special Assistant to the President of National Security Affairs. Rice was instrumental to help with developing Bush's and James Baker's policies to make full reunification of Germany. She impressed President Bush, so much, that he said to Gorbachev she "tells me everything I know about the Soviet Union."[5]

By 1990 she was already George H. W. Bush's principal advisor on the Soviet Union and one of his assistants for National Security Affairs. She was the highest ranking black woman in the administration.

After the communists were defeated in 1991, Rice victoriously returned to her being a teaching position at Stanford, although she consulted on the former USSR for many. Pete Wilson made her to a bipartisan committee that had been formed to draw new lines for voting. She was also in a Federal Advisory Committee on men and woman training in the Military.

She was helping George W. Bush for his victorious campaign for President in 2000, a thing for which she became later a key advisor. She said in departure from the failed Clinton policies of the 1990s and an articulation of a new Bush plan at the convention speech “...America's armed forces are not a global police force. They are not the world's 911.”[6]

Advising of National Security

On 2000, Rice was made National Security Advisor and no longer served in Stanford. She was the first woman ever there. Over 2001, Rice worked on CIA Director George Tenet almost daily trying to stop the upcoming September 11th which was not yet happened but might have in the future, and did. Rice asked Tenet to give a presentation for the matter to Secretary Rumsfeld and General Attorney John Ashcroft, but they did nothing, absolving Ric of the blame but some have therefore been critical of Rumsfeld.[7]

Rice was out on front in terms of the 2003 invasion of Iraq to removal brutal tyrant Saddam from power. She famously editorialized how there was a lying Iraq in The New York Times entitled "Why We Know Iraq Is Lying."[8]

Rice in 2004 initially decided not to publicly testify at the 9/11 commission. Bush said executive privilege under constitutional separation of powers and said she would not testify. Under pressure, Bush eventually said she would testify [3http://www.cnn.com/2004/ALLPOLITICS/04/08/rice.transcript/] as long as this meant that it wasn't done again necessarily and that others might not testify. She thusly was first of sitting National Security Advisor to testify.

Leading up to the 2004 U.S. Presidential election, Rice became the first National Security Advisor to campaign for an incumbent president. She used this moment to state her belief that Saddam's government in Iraq made for terrorist circumstances that produced terrorism like the 9/11 attacks on America. At a Pittsburgh, she said "While Saddam Hussein had nothing to do with the actual attacks on America, Saddam Hussein's Iraq was a part of the Middle East that was festering and unstable, [and] was part of the circumstances that created the problem on September 11."

She also supported Bush's attempt to end the unfair affirmative action policies at the University of Minnesota. Famously she said once "The problem here is that there will always be some uncertainty about how quickly he can acquire nuclear weapons. But we don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud."[9]

Although some have criticized this as fear mongering she was herself only warning about the need for caution and the consequences of error, and because it was shown that Saddam could have gotten WMDs if he had wanted to the critics generally say that this position has been vindicated.[Citation Needed]

References