Difference between revisions of "Conservative Party of Canada"

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After the defeat of The Right Honourable Kim Campbell and the Progressive-Conservatives in the General Election of 1994, the Progressive-Conservatives were reduced to just two seats in the House of Commons. Another right-of-center party, the Reform Party, gained 52 seats in that election. In 200, the Reform Party changed its name to the "Canadian Alliance." After a decade of proving ineffective as many [[conservative]] Canadians had trouble being represented by a vote split between the Canadian Alliance and the members of the Progressive-Conservatives, the PCs and the Alliance merged in 2003 to form the Conservative Party of Canada.
 
After the defeat of The Right Honourable Kim Campbell and the Progressive-Conservatives in the General Election of 1994, the Progressive-Conservatives were reduced to just two seats in the House of Commons. Another right-of-center party, the Reform Party, gained 52 seats in that election. In 200, the Reform Party changed its name to the "Canadian Alliance." After a decade of proving ineffective as many [[conservative]] Canadians had trouble being represented by a vote split between the Canadian Alliance and the members of the Progressive-Conservatives, the PCs and the Alliance merged in 2003 to form the Conservative Party of Canada.
  
Many [[liberal]]s are critical of the party's views with respect to issues of "social freedom", such as [[same sex marriage]]. The conservatives followed through with their promise to open up the issue of gay marriage for debate again in the House of Commons. However, as a result, there were no changes to current legislation.
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Many [[liberal]]s are critical of the party's views with respect to issues of "social freedom", such as [[same-sex marriage]]. The conservatives followed through with their promise to open up the issue of same-sex marriage for debate again in the House of Commons. However, as a result, there were no changes to current legislation.
  
 
[[Category:Canada]]
 
[[Category:Canada]]

Revision as of 08:37, 6 April 2007

The Conservative Party of Canada was formed by an amalgamation of the Progressive-Conservative Party of Canada, and the Canadian Alliance. This effectively united the right-of-center Canadians under one common banner, allowing for much greater success in the most recent election.

After the defeat of The Right Honourable Kim Campbell and the Progressive-Conservatives in the General Election of 1994, the Progressive-Conservatives were reduced to just two seats in the House of Commons. Another right-of-center party, the Reform Party, gained 52 seats in that election. In 200, the Reform Party changed its name to the "Canadian Alliance." After a decade of proving ineffective as many conservative Canadians had trouble being represented by a vote split between the Canadian Alliance and the members of the Progressive-Conservatives, the PCs and the Alliance merged in 2003 to form the Conservative Party of Canada.

Many liberals are critical of the party's views with respect to issues of "social freedom", such as same-sex marriage. The conservatives followed through with their promise to open up the issue of same-sex marriage for debate again in the House of Commons. However, as a result, there were no changes to current legislation.