Difference between revisions of "David Farabee"

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(Created page with "{{Infobox officeholder | name=David Lee Farabee​ |nationality=American​ | office=Texas State Representative for<br> District 69 (Wichita and Archer c...")
 
(Background)
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| name=David Lee Farabee​
 
| name=David Lee Farabee​
 
|nationality=[[United States|American]]​
 
|nationality=[[United States|American]]​
| office=[[Texas]] State Representative for<br> District 69 (Wichita and Archer counties)​
+
| office=[[Texas]] State Representative<br>for  District 69 (Wichita<br>and Archer counties)​
 
| party=[[Democratic Party|Democrat]]  ​
 
| party=[[Democratic Party|Democrat]]  ​
 
| term_start=1999​
 
| term_start=1999​
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| residence=Wichita Falls, Texas​
 
| residence=Wichita Falls, Texas​
 
| spouse= Terri Nan Salmon Farabee​
 
| spouse= Terri Nan Salmon Farabee​
| children= Worth Farabee<br>​
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| children=Worth Farabee​
 
Nancy Farabee<br>​
 
Nancy Farabee<br>​
 
Russell R. Farabee​<br>
 
Russell R. Farabee​<br>
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His father, [[Ray Farabee]], was an [[attorney]] in [[Austin]], Texas, and from 1975 to 1988 a Democratic former state senator for the Wichita Falls/west Texas region.​
 
His father, [[Ray Farabee]], was an [[attorney]] in [[Austin]], Texas, and from 1975 to 1988 a Democratic former state senator for the Wichita Falls/west Texas region.​
 
 
==Background==
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==Background==
 
An [[Eagle Scout]], Farabee graduated from Wichita Falls High School and then obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls. He and his wife, the former Terri Nan Salmon, have three children, Worth, Nancy, and Russell R. Farabee. He is affiliated with the [[United Methodist]] Church. He is a former president of the Wichita Falls Optimist Club.<ref name=vsmart>{{cite web|url=http://www.votesmart.org/bio.php?can_id=25518|title=Rep. David Farabee (Texas)|publisher=votesmart.org|accessdate=January 17, 2020}}</ref>​
 
An [[Eagle Scout]], Farabee graduated from Wichita Falls High School and then obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls. He and his wife, the former Terri Nan Salmon, have three children, Worth, Nancy, and Russell R. Farabee. He is affiliated with the [[United Methodist]] Church. He is a former president of the Wichita Falls Optimist Club.<ref name=vsmart>{{cite web|url=http://www.votesmart.org/bio.php?can_id=25518|title=Rep. David Farabee (Texas)|publisher=votesmart.org|accessdate=January 17, 2020}}</ref>​
+
 
 
His late mother, [[Helen Farabee]], is the namesake of the state mental health facility in Wichita Falls, Graham in Young County and Quanah in Hardeman County. The senior Farabee left the state Senate after thirteen years to become general counsel for the [[University of Texas]] System.<ref name=farabee/> Farabee's father-in-law, Bill Presson, is a [[Republican Party|Republican]] commissioner in Wichita County.<ref name=wichita>{{cite web|url=http://www.davidfarabee.com/news/2009/09/16/our-opinion-farabee-its-the-man-not-the-party/#more-330|title=Our opinion: Farabee: "It's the man, not the party|date=September 16, 2009|publisher=''Wichita Falls Record News'' in davidfarabee.com|accessdate=November 27, 2009}}</ref> When Democratic state legislators known as the Killer D's fled to Ardmore, [[Oklahoma]] in 2003 to prevent a House [[quorum]] regarding congressional [[redistricting]], many of Farabee's constituents were said to have been particularly aware for perhaps the first time that he is a Democrat.<ref name=wichita/>​
 
His late mother, [[Helen Farabee]], is the namesake of the state mental health facility in Wichita Falls, Graham in Young County and Quanah in Hardeman County. The senior Farabee left the state Senate after thirteen years to become general counsel for the [[University of Texas]] System.<ref name=farabee/> Farabee's father-in-law, Bill Presson, is a [[Republican Party|Republican]] commissioner in Wichita County.<ref name=wichita>{{cite web|url=http://www.davidfarabee.com/news/2009/09/16/our-opinion-farabee-its-the-man-not-the-party/#more-330|title=Our opinion: Farabee: "It's the man, not the party|date=September 16, 2009|publisher=''Wichita Falls Record News'' in davidfarabee.com|accessdate=November 27, 2009}}</ref> When Democratic state legislators known as the Killer D's fled to Ardmore, [[Oklahoma]] in 2003 to prevent a House [[quorum]] regarding congressional [[redistricting]], many of Farabee's constituents were said to have been particularly aware for perhaps the first time that he is a Democrat.<ref name=wichita/>​
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==Legislative career==
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==Legislative career==
 +
 
 
In 1998, Farabee won his seat, then considered one of the most Republican-leaning districts in the Texas House that was represented at this time by a Democrat.<ref name=farabee>{{cite web|url=http://www.reporternews.com/news/2009/oct/03/mcneely-rep-david-farabee-retiring-blow-democrats/|title=McNeely: Rep. David Farabee retiring a blow for Democrats|title=October 5, 2009|author=''Abilene Reporter-News''|accessdate=November 27, 2009}}</ref> Wichita Falls [[Mayor]] Lanham Lyne defeated a Democrat named Michael L. Smith, 74-26 percent, to win Farabee's seat in the November 2 general election.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://enr.sos.state.tx.us/enr/results/nov02_154_state.htm|title=General election returns, November 2, 2010|publisher=Texas Secretary of State|accessdate=November 7, 2010}}</ref> Farabee himself had estimated that a Democrat expecting to hold the seat would need to raise at least $250,000.<ref name=farabee/>​ Lyne did not seek a second term in 2010.
 
In 1998, Farabee won his seat, then considered one of the most Republican-leaning districts in the Texas House that was represented at this time by a Democrat.<ref name=farabee>{{cite web|url=http://www.reporternews.com/news/2009/oct/03/mcneely-rep-david-farabee-retiring-blow-democrats/|title=McNeely: Rep. David Farabee retiring a blow for Democrats|title=October 5, 2009|author=''Abilene Reporter-News''|accessdate=November 27, 2009}}</ref> Wichita Falls [[Mayor]] Lanham Lyne defeated a Democrat named Michael L. Smith, 74-26 percent, to win Farabee's seat in the November 2 general election.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://enr.sos.state.tx.us/enr/results/nov02_154_state.htm|title=General election returns, November 2, 2010|publisher=Texas Secretary of State|accessdate=November 7, 2010}}</ref> Farabee himself had estimated that a Democrat expecting to hold the seat would need to raise at least $250,000.<ref name=farabee/>​ Lyne did not seek a second term in 2010.
+
 
In his initial election in 1998, Farabee was unopposed for the Democratic nomination in District 69 when the Democratic incumbent, John Hirschi, did not seek reelection. He defeated the Republican Ronald S. Buffum (born 1945), then of Wichita Falls, 14,207 votes (56.1 percent) to 11,130 (43.9 percent).<ref>Texas Secretary of State, Election Returns, November 1998.</ref>​
+
In his initial election in 1998, Farabee was unopposed for the Democratic nomination in District 69 when the Democratic incumbent, John Hirschi, did not seek reelection. He defeated the Republican Ronald S. Buffum (born 1945), then of Wichita Falls, 14,207 votes (56.1 percent) to 11,130 (43.9 percent).<ref>Texas Secretary of State, Election Returns, November 3, 1998.</ref>​
+
 
 
Republicans left Farabee unopposed in 2008, and the Democrat garnered more than 58 percent of the vote in 2006 against a [[Libertarian Party|Libertarian]] and a Republican, Shirley Craft, who had also lost to Farabee in 2004.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://texasweekly.com/newsletter/tw20061113.html|title="Texas Weekly: The Eye of the Storm", November 13, 2006|accessdate=December 5, 2009}}</ref> State Representative Mark Strama, an Austin Democrat, said that his party can win District 69. He recalled that in 2006 the Democrats held the [[West Texas]] state House seat vacated by former [[Speaker]] James E. "Pete" Laney. Joseph P. Heflin, the [[county judge]] in Crosbyton, narrowly defeated a young Republican [[insurance]] agent from Plainview in Hale County,  [[Jim Landtroop]], who had considerable support from the state's [[Republican Party (United States)|GOP]] leaders.<ref name=farabee/> Landtroop rebounded in 2010 to deny Heflin a third term in the legislature but was himself unseated in 2012 in the runoff election by the [[Moderate Republican]] Ken King of Canadian in Hemphill County.​
 
Republicans left Farabee unopposed in 2008, and the Democrat garnered more than 58 percent of the vote in 2006 against a [[Libertarian Party|Libertarian]] and a Republican, Shirley Craft, who had also lost to Farabee in 2004.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://texasweekly.com/newsletter/tw20061113.html|title="Texas Weekly: The Eye of the Storm", November 13, 2006|accessdate=December 5, 2009}}</ref> State Representative Mark Strama, an Austin Democrat, said that his party can win District 69. He recalled that in 2006 the Democrats held the [[West Texas]] state House seat vacated by former [[Speaker]] James E. "Pete" Laney. Joseph P. Heflin, the [[county judge]] in Crosbyton, narrowly defeated a young Republican [[insurance]] agent from Plainview in Hale County,  [[Jim Landtroop]], who had considerable support from the state's [[Republican Party (United States)|GOP]] leaders.<ref name=farabee/> Landtroop rebounded in 2010 to deny Heflin a third term in the legislature but was himself unseated in 2012 in the runoff election by the [[Moderate Republican]] Ken King of Canadian in Hemphill County.​
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Farabee served on the Energy Resources and State Affairs committees in the Texas House. In 2005, he supported the position of the [[National Abortion Rights Action League]] on [[abortion]] 55 percent of the time; in 2007, NARAL rated him 0 percent.<ref name=vsmart/> In 2008, he was voted "A+" by the [[National Rifle Association]]. In 2001, he was rated 100 percent by the [[NAACP]]. In 2009, he was rated 17 percent by [[conservative]] [[Phyllis Schlafly]]'s [[Eagle Forum]], but the same organization rated him 68 percent in 2007. The [[interest group]] Texans for Fiscal Responsibility rated Farabee 38 percent in 2009.<ref name=vsmart/>​
 
Farabee served on the Energy Resources and State Affairs committees in the Texas House. In 2005, he supported the position of the [[National Abortion Rights Action League]] on [[abortion]] 55 percent of the time; in 2007, NARAL rated him 0 percent.<ref name=vsmart/> In 2008, he was voted "A+" by the [[National Rifle Association]]. In 2001, he was rated 100 percent by the [[NAACP]]. In 2009, he was rated 17 percent by [[conservative]] [[Phyllis Schlafly]]'s [[Eagle Forum]], but the same organization rated him 68 percent in 2007. The [[interest group]] Texans for Fiscal Responsibility rated Farabee 38 percent in 2009.<ref name=vsmart/>​
+
 
 
Prior to his legislative service, Farabee was an at-large member of the Wichita Falls City Council from 1989 to 1993. He is a partner of Boley-Featherston Insurance Agency in Wichita Falls.<ref name=vsmart/>​
 
Prior to his legislative service, Farabee was an at-large member of the Wichita Falls City Council from 1989 to 1993. He is a partner of Boley-Featherston Insurance Agency in Wichita Falls.<ref name=vsmart/>​
  

Revision as of 09:57, 17 January 2020

David Lee Farabee​

Texas State Representative
for District 69 (Wichita
and Archer counties)​
In office
1999​ – January 2011​
Preceded by John Hirschi​
Succeeded by Lanham Lyne​

Born February 5, 1964​
Wichita Falls, Texas​
Nationality American
Political party Democrat
Spouse(s) Terri Nan Salmon Farabee​
Children Worth Farabee​

Nancy Farabee
​ Russell R. Farabee​
Parents:
Ray Farabee
Helen Farabee

Residence Wichita Falls, Texas​
Alma mater (1) Wichita Falls High School​

(2) Midwestern State University (Wichita Falls)

Occupation Insurance agent​
Religion United Methodist

David Lee Farabee (born February 5, 1964) is a Democratic former state representative for District 69 in Wichita and Archer counties, Texas.​ ​ His father, Ray Farabee, was an attorney in Austin, Texas, and from 1975 to 1988 a Democratic former state senator for the Wichita Falls/west Texas region.​ ​

Background

An Eagle Scout, Farabee graduated from Wichita Falls High School and then obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls. He and his wife, the former Terri Nan Salmon, have three children, Worth, Nancy, and Russell R. Farabee. He is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. He is a former president of the Wichita Falls Optimist Club.[1]

His late mother, Helen Farabee, is the namesake of the state mental health facility in Wichita Falls, Graham in Young County and Quanah in Hardeman County. The senior Farabee left the state Senate after thirteen years to become general counsel for the University of Texas System.[2] Farabee's father-in-law, Bill Presson, is a Republican commissioner in Wichita County.[3] When Democratic state legislators known as the Killer D's fled to Ardmore, Oklahoma in 2003 to prevent a House quorum regarding congressional redistricting, many of Farabee's constituents were said to have been particularly aware for perhaps the first time that he is a Democrat.[3]

Legislative career

In 1998, Farabee won his seat, then considered one of the most Republican-leaning districts in the Texas House that was represented at this time by a Democrat.[2] Wichita Falls Mayor Lanham Lyne defeated a Democrat named Michael L. Smith, 74-26 percent, to win Farabee's seat in the November 2 general election.[4] Farabee himself had estimated that a Democrat expecting to hold the seat would need to raise at least $250,000.[2]​ Lyne did not seek a second term in 2010.

In his initial election in 1998, Farabee was unopposed for the Democratic nomination in District 69 when the Democratic incumbent, John Hirschi, did not seek reelection. He defeated the Republican Ronald S. Buffum (born 1945), then of Wichita Falls, 14,207 votes (56.1 percent) to 11,130 (43.9 percent).[5]

Republicans left Farabee unopposed in 2008, and the Democrat garnered more than 58 percent of the vote in 2006 against a Libertarian and a Republican, Shirley Craft, who had also lost to Farabee in 2004.[6] State Representative Mark Strama, an Austin Democrat, said that his party can win District 69. He recalled that in 2006 the Democrats held the West Texas state House seat vacated by former Speaker James E. "Pete" Laney. Joseph P. Heflin, the county judge in Crosbyton, narrowly defeated a young Republican insurance agent from Plainview in Hale County, Jim Landtroop, who had considerable support from the state's GOP leaders.[2] Landtroop rebounded in 2010 to deny Heflin a third term in the legislature but was himself unseated in 2012 in the runoff election by the Moderate Republican Ken King of Canadian in Hemphill County.​

Farabee served on the Energy Resources and State Affairs committees in the Texas House. In 2005, he supported the position of the National Abortion Rights Action League on abortion 55 percent of the time; in 2007, NARAL rated him 0 percent.[1] In 2008, he was voted "A+" by the National Rifle Association. In 2001, he was rated 100 percent by the NAACP. In 2009, he was rated 17 percent by conservative Phyllis Schlafly's Eagle Forum, but the same organization rated him 68 percent in 2007. The interest group Texans for Fiscal Responsibility rated Farabee 38 percent in 2009.[1]

Prior to his legislative service, Farabee was an at-large member of the Wichita Falls City Council from 1989 to 1993. He is a partner of Boley-Featherston Insurance Agency in Wichita Falls.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Rep. David Farabee (Texas). votesmart.org. Retrieved on January 17, 2020.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Abilene Reporter-News. October 5, 2009. Retrieved on November 27, 2009.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Our opinion: Farabee: "It's the man, not the party. Wichita Falls Record News in davidfarabee.com (September 16, 2009). Retrieved on November 27, 2009.
  4. General election returns, November 2, 2010. Texas Secretary of State. Retrieved on November 7, 2010.
  5. Texas Secretary of State, Election Returns, November 3, 1998.
  6. "Texas Weekly: The Eye of the Storm", November 13, 2006. Retrieved on December 5, 2009.

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