Difference between revisions of "Debate:Was the United States right to drop atomic bombs so quickly on Hiroshima and Nagasaki?"

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(It saved lives!)
(nessecary! no question.)
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==It saved lives!==
 
==It saved lives!==
 
Operation Downfall was the allied plan to invade the Imperial Japanese mainland. Operation Olympic on November 1, 1945 and then Operation Coronet on March 1, 1946. Allied bombing raids would've continued into 1946 and by the end of hostilities there would've been massive civilian casualties. The Second World War would have ended with a much greater toll in human lives then it did. Droping two atomic bombs on two cities that would've been destroyed by conventional means expedited an end to that conflict. Waiting any longer would have resulted in implementing Operation Downfall. Waiting would have meant continued warfare and loss of lives.--[[User:Roopilots6|Roopilots6]] 19:42, 11 April 2007 (EDT)
 
Operation Downfall was the allied plan to invade the Imperial Japanese mainland. Operation Olympic on November 1, 1945 and then Operation Coronet on March 1, 1946. Allied bombing raids would've continued into 1946 and by the end of hostilities there would've been massive civilian casualties. The Second World War would have ended with a much greater toll in human lives then it did. Droping two atomic bombs on two cities that would've been destroyed by conventional means expedited an end to that conflict. Waiting any longer would have resulted in implementing Operation Downfall. Waiting would have meant continued warfare and loss of lives.--[[User:Roopilots6|Roopilots6]] 19:42, 11 April 2007 (EDT)
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Hey its either 200000 of them or 2 million marines? i chose them. not because i am american, but because 2 million lives is a whole lot!!! i may sound savage but i think it was nessecary. --[[User:Will N.|Will N.]] 20:16, 11 April 2007 (EDT)
  
 
== It was to keep the Soviet Union out of Japan ==
 
== It was to keep the Soviet Union out of Japan ==
  
 
The allies had agreed to a partitioning of Germany after the victory over Hitler.  The United States, however, had conducted the Pacific War practically alone and we did not intend to share the fruits of victory with the Soviet Union after a protracted sea-land invasion of the home islands by both countries.  Therefore, Harry Truman undertook to force Japan to capitulate before the USSR could mobilize by knocking out two Japanese cities with the nuclear bombs.  The detonations also had a dampening effect on further Soviet aggression until 1949 when they obtained their own atomic devices. [[User:Teresita|Teresita]] 20:11, 11 April 2007 (EDT)
 
The allies had agreed to a partitioning of Germany after the victory over Hitler.  The United States, however, had conducted the Pacific War practically alone and we did not intend to share the fruits of victory with the Soviet Union after a protracted sea-land invasion of the home islands by both countries.  Therefore, Harry Truman undertook to force Japan to capitulate before the USSR could mobilize by knocking out two Japanese cities with the nuclear bombs.  The detonations also had a dampening effect on further Soviet aggression until 1949 when they obtained their own atomic devices. [[User:Teresita|Teresita]] 20:11, 11 April 2007 (EDT)

Revision as of 18:16, 11 April 2007

It saved lives!

Operation Downfall was the allied plan to invade the Imperial Japanese mainland. Operation Olympic on November 1, 1945 and then Operation Coronet on March 1, 1946. Allied bombing raids would've continued into 1946 and by the end of hostilities there would've been massive civilian casualties. The Second World War would have ended with a much greater toll in human lives then it did. Droping two atomic bombs on two cities that would've been destroyed by conventional means expedited an end to that conflict. Waiting any longer would have resulted in implementing Operation Downfall. Waiting would have meant continued warfare and loss of lives.--Roopilots6 19:42, 11 April 2007 (EDT)

Hey its either 200000 of them or 2 million marines? i chose them. not because i am american, but because 2 million lives is a whole lot!!! i may sound savage but i think it was nessecary. --Will N. 20:16, 11 April 2007 (EDT)

It was to keep the Soviet Union out of Japan

The allies had agreed to a partitioning of Germany after the victory over Hitler. The United States, however, had conducted the Pacific War practically alone and we did not intend to share the fruits of victory with the Soviet Union after a protracted sea-land invasion of the home islands by both countries. Therefore, Harry Truman undertook to force Japan to capitulate before the USSR could mobilize by knocking out two Japanese cities with the nuclear bombs. The detonations also had a dampening effect on further Soviet aggression until 1949 when they obtained their own atomic devices. Teresita 20:11, 11 April 2007 (EDT)