Difference between revisions of "Doctorate"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
A Doctorate is the highest earned degree awarded by a University.  In the early days of the University movement, the title "Doctor" (Latin for "Teacher" was only honorary, and typically awarded for some achievement of note in the outside world, such as when Samuel Johnson was awarded a Doctorate in Letters (L.L.D.) by [[Oxford University|Oxford]] for his work on his Dictionary.  In the nineteenth century, first in [[Germany]] and later in other nations in Europe and in the United States, the degree of "Doctor of Philosophy" (Latin "Philosophiae Doctoris", thus Ph.D.) was established as the final result of an program of advanced study, culminating in a [[dissertation]] or formal (not always published) work.  Though originally awarded only in Philosophy, the Ph.D. is now also awarded in numerous fields of the Humanities and Sciences.  Honorary Doctorates are still awarded, but are not considered the equivalent of "earned" doctorates obtained through study.
+
A Doctorate is the highest earned degree awarded by a University.  In the early days of the University movement, the title "Doctor" (Latin for "Teacher" was only honorary, and typically awarded for some achievement of note in the outside world, such as when Samuel Johnson was awarded a Doctorate in Letters (L.L.D.) by [[Oxford University|Oxford]] for his work on his Dictionary.  In the nineteenth century, first in [[Germany]] and later in other nations in Europe and in the United States, the degree of "Doctor of Philosophy" (Latin "Philosophiae Doctoris", thus Ph.D.) was established as the final result of an program of advanced study, culminating in a [[dissertation]] or formal (not always published) work.  Though originally awarded only in Philosophy, the Ph.D. is now also awarded in numerous fields of the Humanities and Sciences.  Honorary Doctorates are still awarded, but are not considered the equivalent of "earned" doctorates obtained through study, original research, and gumption.
 
[[Category:science]]
 
[[Category:science]]

Revision as of 08:50, 13 April 2007

A Doctorate is the highest earned degree awarded by a University. In the early days of the University movement, the title "Doctor" (Latin for "Teacher" was only honorary, and typically awarded for some achievement of note in the outside world, such as when Samuel Johnson was awarded a Doctorate in Letters (L.L.D.) by Oxford for his work on his Dictionary. In the nineteenth century, first in Germany and later in other nations in Europe and in the United States, the degree of "Doctor of Philosophy" (Latin "Philosophiae Doctoris", thus Ph.D.) was established as the final result of an program of advanced study, culminating in a dissertation or formal (not always published) work. Though originally awarded only in Philosophy, the Ph.D. is now also awarded in numerous fields of the Humanities and Sciences. Honorary Doctorates are still awarded, but are not considered the equivalent of "earned" doctorates obtained through study, original research, and gumption.