Difference between revisions of "Dry county"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(topic related to prohibition and alcohol)
 
(As of 2012, there are more than 200 completely or nearly completely dry counties in the United States - nearly 10% of all the counties in the nation.)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
A '''dry county''' is a region of the country that has voted together to enforce [[prohibition]] on the [[county]] level. Reasons given for having such a county-wide law include: elimination of [[drunk driving]], community health, and one less cause of moral dissolution. Since prohibition is forbidden on the national and state level by the [[Twenty-First Amendment]], this is the best that prohibitionists can currently attain through legal channels. [[Kansas]] and [[Arkansas]] are among the states with the most dry counties. The opposite of a dry county is a "wet county".
 
A '''dry county''' is a region of the country that has voted together to enforce [[prohibition]] on the [[county]] level. Reasons given for having such a county-wide law include: elimination of [[drunk driving]], community health, and one less cause of moral dissolution. Since prohibition is forbidden on the national and state level by the [[Twenty-First Amendment]], this is the best that prohibitionists can currently attain through legal channels. [[Kansas]] and [[Arkansas]] are among the states with the most dry counties. The opposite of a dry county is a "wet county".
 +
 +
As of 2012, there are more than 200 completely or nearly completely dry counties in the United States - nearly 10% of all the counties in the nation.<ref>http://io9.com/5895477/these-are-the-places-in-america-where-alcohol-is-still-banned</ref>  In addition, there are many "moist" counties that also place restrictions on the sale of alcohol.
 +
 +
== References ==
 +
 +
<references/>
  
 
[[Category:Government]][[Category:Morality]]
 
[[Category:Government]][[Category:Morality]]

Latest revision as of 09:33, 13 October 2012

A dry county is a region of the country that has voted together to enforce prohibition on the county level. Reasons given for having such a county-wide law include: elimination of drunk driving, community health, and one less cause of moral dissolution. Since prohibition is forbidden on the national and state level by the Twenty-First Amendment, this is the best that prohibitionists can currently attain through legal channels. Kansas and Arkansas are among the states with the most dry counties. The opposite of a dry county is a "wet county".

As of 2012, there are more than 200 completely or nearly completely dry counties in the United States - nearly 10% of all the counties in the nation.[1] In addition, there are many "moist" counties that also place restrictions on the sale of alcohol.

References

  1. http://io9.com/5895477/these-are-the-places-in-america-where-alcohol-is-still-banned