Difference between revisions of "Essay:Draft Conservapedia Application to Become SES Provider"

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(Section C: almost complete)
(better)
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== Section A ==
 
== Section A ==
  
Alignment to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards (CCCS)<ref>www.nj.gov/njded/aps/cccs</ref> and the district's instructional programs (40 points maximum)
+
Alignment to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards (CCCS)<ref>http://www.nj.gov/njded/aps/cccs</ref> and the district's instructional programs (40 points maximum)
  
 
The courses provided by Conservapedia include:
 
The courses provided by Conservapedia include:
  
*American History
+
*U.S. History
 
*World History
 
*World History
 
*American Government
 
*American Government
Line 44: Line 44:
 
=== 5 points ===
 
=== 5 points ===
 
Describe specific methods and strategies for serving eligible students from special populations such as students with learning disabilities, English Language Learners, etc.
 
Describe specific methods and strategies for serving eligible students from special populations such as students with learning disabilities, English Language Learners, etc.
 +
 +
: Our program has included many students having learning disabilities.  We make the materials straightforward and as logical as possible to help those students gain knowledge and confidence.  Specifically, <continue>
  
 
=== 5 points ===
 
=== 5 points ===
 
Describe the organizational structure of service delivery (location, supervision, staff). In this section, include a typical schedule for SES. The schedule must be included for any program that exceeds three consecutive hours of instruction in one time period. (Do not include “snack time”.)
 
Describe the organizational structure of service delivery (location, supervision, staff). In this section, include a typical schedule for SES. The schedule must be included for any program that exceeds three consecutive hours of instruction in one time period. (Do not include “snack time”.)
 +
 +
: Service delivery consists of a two-hour program with a break halfway.  The program includes time for discussion and debate, but not "snack time."  The planned location will be at the public school where the students are located.
 +
 +
: Sessions will meet one day a week for about 14 weeks.  There is a midterm and final exam to motivate the students, along with weekly homework assignments.
 +
 +
: The internet is used for prompter feedback than is possible otherwise.  If students do not have access to the internet, then they hand in their homework on paper.  If students have access to the internet and are willing to post their work online anonymously, then feedback is within hours or days of their posting their work.
 +
 +
: In many teenagers there is an improvement in their homework if they post it publicly on an internet site, much as an adult improves his writings or presentations when he knows the public will be evaluating it.  The use of the internet is voluntary in this program but results in substantial benefits for those who choose to participate in it.
 +
 +
: The teacher for this program is primarily Andy Schlafly.  Other teachers, if any, will work with his close participation and supervision.
  
 
== Section B ==
 
== Section B ==
Line 117: Line 129:
  
 
Provide evidence of employment of qualified instructional staff (at a minimum 60 college credits or an associate's degree) and a demonstrated commitment to the provision of ongoing professional development and improvement of services (10 points maximum)
 
Provide evidence of employment of qualified instructional staff (at a minimum 60 college credits or an associate's degree) and a demonstrated commitment to the provision of ongoing professional development and improvement of services (10 points maximum)
 +
 +
: The teacher is Andy Schlafly, B.S.E., Princeton University (1981), J.D., Harvard Law School (1991), Adjunct Professor, Seton Hall University of Law (1995), instructor of 170 high school-aged students, 2002-2009.
 +
 +
: He welcomes feedback on this program and is committed to improving it each year based on student performance on class exams and homework and on standardized tests, parental feedback, and college admission rates.
 +
 +
: Other staff, if any, will be limited to those having a proven record of academic achievement and at least 60 college credits or an associate's degree.  They will be carefully screened using background checks, references, extensive interviews and a thorough review of their work-product.
  
 
== Section G ==
 
== Section G ==
  
 
Provide evidence that the program complies with federal, state, and local health and safety standards and that your agency has a plan to address discipline problems and emergency situations to ensure the safety of students while in the program (20 points maximum)
 
Provide evidence that the program complies with federal, state, and local health and safety standards and that your agency has a plan to address discipline problems and emergency situations to ensure the safety of students while in the program (20 points maximum)
 +
 +
: The program has taught over 170 students since 2002 without a single instance of a health, safety, discipline or other problem under federal, state and/or local standards.
 +
 +
: The courses will be taught at the public school, which already has facilities available to handle any emergencies that may arise.
 +
 +
: The instructor has a cell phone and contact information for emergency services and families to address any crisis that may occur.
  
 
== Section H ==
 
== Section H ==
  
Provide evidence of financial capacity.  It appears that no points are awarded for this section, but points may be deducted if inadequate.  
+
Provide evidence of financial capacity.  It appears that no points are awarded for this section, but points may be deducted if inadequate.
 +
 
 +
: This program has existed since 2002 and has paid every obligation, and even donated time and money beyond its obligations.  A letter is attached from a banking institution evidencing the creditworthiness.  (need to attach letter).  
  
 
== Application Format ==
 
== Application Format ==

Revision as of 09:15, 18 February 2009

This is a working draft of an application by Conservapedia to become an SES provider.

In New Jersey, there are seven key parts to the application for assessment, in addition to absolute requirements.[1]

For a new applicant such as Conservapedia, there are two parts to the application: Parts I and II. Part I concerns completion of mandatory requirements, while Part II is based on a point system with 98 out of 140 total points needed to obtain approval. (Part III applies only to renewal applications.)

Part I (mandatory provisions):
  • Section A (identification info)
  • Section B (geographic service area)
  • Section C (academic/instructional information)
  • Section D (recruitment of students - 300 character limit)
  • Section E (statement of qualifications and effectiveness - 300 character limit)
  • Section F (fees, which can be a sliding scale)
  • Section G (attaching business documentation)

Part II consists of the program proposal, and it has several sections as explained below:

Section A

Alignment to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards (CCCS)[2] and the district's instructional programs (40 points maximum)

The courses provided by Conservapedia include:

  • U.S. History
  • World History
  • American Government
  • Writing
  • Economics

In addition, courses can be easily developed to address:

  • pre-college mathematics
  • pre-college science
  • reading
  • grammar

15 points

Describe how the services offered are aligned with language arts literacy, reading, science and mathematics standards as outlined in the NJ CCCS. Cite examples of specific standards and elements of the program.

15 points

Demonstrate a clear link between the academic program that a student experiences during the regular school day and the instruction of the SES program provided. Explain how your program complements the district’s prevailing instructional program.

5 points

Describe specific methods and strategies for serving eligible students from special populations such as students with learning disabilities, English Language Learners, etc.

Our program has included many students having learning disabilities. We make the materials straightforward and as logical as possible to help those students gain knowledge and confidence. Specifically, <continue>

5 points

Describe the organizational structure of service delivery (location, supervision, staff). In this section, include a typical schedule for SES. The schedule must be included for any program that exceeds three consecutive hours of instruction in one time period. (Do not include “snack time”.)

Service delivery consists of a two-hour program with a break halfway. The program includes time for discussion and debate, but not "snack time." The planned location will be at the public school where the students are located.
Sessions will meet one day a week for about 14 weeks. There is a midterm and final exam to motivate the students, along with weekly homework assignments.
The internet is used for prompter feedback than is possible otherwise. If students do not have access to the internet, then they hand in their homework on paper. If students have access to the internet and are willing to post their work online anonymously, then feedback is within hours or days of their posting their work.
In many teenagers there is an improvement in their homework if they post it publicly on an internet site, much as an adult improves his writings or presentations when he knows the public will be evaluating it. The use of the internet is voluntary in this program but results in substantial benefits for those who choose to participate in it.
The teacher for this program is primarily Andy Schlafly. Other teachers, if any, will work with his close participation and supervision.

Section B

Key instructional practices and major program elements must be (1) high quality, (2) based on research (citations required), and (3) specifically designed to increase student academic achievement (10 points maximum)

Section C

Provide a clear, concise narrative including evidence of program effectiveness in improving student's academic achievement (35 points maximum)

Examples of Evidence of Effectiveness:


-Student achievement data from valid and reliable performance tests from a state, district, and/or an independent test developer.

Our program has resulted in tremendous academic success by participants. In 2003, for example, about 30 teenagers took a one-semester course in this program on American History. The class was open to all without any pre-selection based on test scores or intelligence, and the diverse student body included those having a learning disability or having encountered difficulties in public school. The "in class" students totaled 28, and there were also a few purely on-line participants.
Despite being only a one-semester course, students excelled on the College Board SAT II exam afterward. Five (5) students scored 720 or higher on the SAT II, and a total of eleven (11) students scored 600 or higher. Given that these students were competing against mostly older college-bound high school students who had taken a full year, or even two years, of U.S. History, these scores after this one-semester, one-day-a-week program were remarkable.
Students from that class ultimately went on to excel far above expectations. One student, for example, who had struggled at public school, went on to win a full scholarship at the leading university in New Jersey, and will graduate in the 2009-10 academic year. Others eventually went to attend other top college programs, including the United States Coast Guard Academy, Grove City College, Thomas Aquinas College, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Patrick Henry College.
The success of the 2003 U.S. History course led to this program offering it again in 2006. Then 43 students took this one-day-a-week, one-semester class. The College Board SAT II exam had changed by then, with an emphasis on topics like popular culture that our class did not cover. Nevertheless, at least ten (10) students scored at 610 or higher, and one student attained a perfect score of 800/800. As before, students from this class ultimately went to fine universities, with one student earning a full college scholarship. Due to its remarkable success, in 2008 another offering of this course attracted 65 students.
Other courses in this program have achieved even better results. A one-semester economics course in this program was taught in 2004 and 2007. It yielded a 100% pass rate on the college-level CLEP examination, with at least five students excelling on the exam. This program offered a course in American Government in 2003 and 2007, with similar success. After the American Government course in 2003, for example, seven (7) students passed the CLEP exam for college credit, and another three students who had done as well in the course could have passed the CLEP had they paid the fee and taken it.


-Student performance data using a measure that is not nation- or statewide, using a measure developed by the SES provider, or using school grades, homework completion, or results from a school/teacher administered subject area test.

Homework completion rates are extraordinarily high in this program. For example, in the U.S. History class offered in 2006, there were 504 homework assignments. 488 out of 504 assignments were completed by the teenage students, representing a completion rate of 96.8%.


-Letters of reference from previous clients, such as parents or students, offering testimonials on the positive impact of your program.

Can use emails of gratitude, plus ask for testimonials now


-Additional evidence of improved outcomes, such as student attendance, retention/promotion rates,graduation rates, family/parent satisfaction, and/or improved student behavior/discipline, as well as narrative excerpts from students themselves.

Over 170 students have participated in this program, from diverse backgrounds and without any pre-selection standards. There has not been a single disciplinary program by any of the students. To our knowledge, not one has fallen prey to the problems that afflict so many teenagers: drugs, smoking, alcoholism, depression, crime, or teenage pregnancy.

Section D

Describe clearly the specific assessment programs and practices used to diagnose a student's needs, prescribe an instructional program to meet that student's needs, and evaluate and monitor that student's progress towards clearly identified goals (15 points maximum)

What the State is looking for:

  • Specific processes you will use to assess and diagnose a student’s needs, identify gaps in skills or knowledge, and prescribe an instructional program based on the student’s individual needs.
  • Specific processes you will use to evaluate, monitor, and track student progress on a continuous and regular basis.
  • How you will develop a timetable for each student’s achievement gain that includes clear goals for the student.

Section E

Explain the proposed process of engaging parents/families and schools/teachers in the development of the Individual Student Learning Plans and the process of providing student progress reports to parents/families and schools (10 points maximum)

States will ask us to describe:

  • Specific procedures used to report student progress to parents and families.
  • Services provided to parents and procedures used for involving parents in creating time lines and goals for their child’s academic progress.
  • Accommodations made for working parents’ needs and schedules.
  • Processes used to resolve any disputes or conflicts that you or your staff may have with parents.
  • Expected role of parents in the services provided by you to their children, if any, and how you work with parents to explain this role.
  • Training that you offer to staff on working with parents, including what is the content of the training, who is the training offered to, and when does the training occur.
  • Information provided by you to parents and families in languages other than English, and if so, which languages.

Section F

Provide evidence of employment of qualified instructional staff (at a minimum 60 college credits or an associate's degree) and a demonstrated commitment to the provision of ongoing professional development and improvement of services (10 points maximum)

The teacher is Andy Schlafly, B.S.E., Princeton University (1981), J.D., Harvard Law School (1991), Adjunct Professor, Seton Hall University of Law (1995), instructor of 170 high school-aged students, 2002-2009.
He welcomes feedback on this program and is committed to improving it each year based on student performance on class exams and homework and on standardized tests, parental feedback, and college admission rates.
Other staff, if any, will be limited to those having a proven record of academic achievement and at least 60 college credits or an associate's degree. They will be carefully screened using background checks, references, extensive interviews and a thorough review of their work-product.

Section G

Provide evidence that the program complies with federal, state, and local health and safety standards and that your agency has a plan to address discipline problems and emergency situations to ensure the safety of students while in the program (20 points maximum)

The program has taught over 170 students since 2002 without a single instance of a health, safety, discipline or other problem under federal, state and/or local standards.
The courses will be taught at the public school, which already has facilities available to handle any emergencies that may arise.
The instructor has a cell phone and contact information for emergency services and families to address any crisis that may occur.

Section H

Provide evidence of financial capacity. It appears that no points are awarded for this section, but points may be deducted if inadequate.

This program has existed since 2002 and has paid every obligation, and even donated time and money beyond its obligations. A letter is attached from a banking institution evidencing the creditworthiness. (need to attach letter).

Application Format

The final application must:

  • use single space and twelve-point font.
  • In the footer, add the name of the applicant agency/district.
  • be printed one-sided, on 8 1/2 x 11 three hole punched white paper.
  • assembled in loose-leaf binders, with each section separated by inserting tabbed dividers with each section clearly identified;
  • submitted as an original and two copies
  • insert a copy of the Provider Profile in the clear slip sheet of the cover.
  • limit necessary attachments to no more than will fit into a 2” binder.
  • DO NOT PERMANENTLY BIND THE APPLICATION OR RELEVANT ATTACHMENTS.

Be sure to include:

  • Provider Profile (Part I of the Application).
  • Provider Program Proposal (Part II of the Application).
  • Provider Assurances (Part III of the Application).
  • Requested attachments.

References

  1. http://www.state.nj.us/education/title1/program/ss/application.pdf
  2. http://www.nj.gov/njded/aps/cccs