Last modified on 9 November 2019, at 21:09

Essay:Worst Liberal Commercials

In the 21st century and to a lesser extent the 20th century, many TV commercials and online advertisements attack Caucasians, males, Christians, and even heterosexuals, while promoting feminism, leftism, environmentalism, and the LGBT agenda.

Name (if applicable) Company/group (if applicable) Year of Release Description
Burger King 2017 Spreads belief in the fictitious "pink tax," a theory that women have to pay more for female-specific products. Promotes feminism. Received a large amount of criticism from conservatives and libertarians.
Huggies 2018 Pushes the homosexual agenda in one commercial released in Canada around Father's Day, showing a homosexual couple with a newborn baby while one of the men in the couple is in a hospital bed, which also pushes the false claim by some delusional leftists that "men can give birth" even though, in reality, men are physically and physiologically incapable of doing so.
Gillette 2019 Attacks masculinity and attacks males for being misogynists, also pushes gender confusion by showing a gender-confused woman using a razor to shave her face as a man does in one commercial while her father, who is enabling and encouraging his daughter's delusion, watches. Received widespread criticism.
Walgreens 2019 Purporting to spotlight women who survived battling cancer, it instead downplays that in favor of pushing feminism and feminist tribalism. Walgreens discontinued the commercial on TV and took it private on its YouTube channel following complaints about the message it sent and its choice of a rap song for its background music.
Reebok 2019 Promotes homosexuality and LGBT pride by featuring an openly homosexual basketball player attempting to advance the LGBT agenda. Also pushes relativity by mentioning "your truth."
Sephora 2019 In a sad attempt to showcase diversity, the advertisement pans through a gender-confused man pretending to be a "woman", a Native American woman, an obese, bald, African-American woman, and an Islamic woman in a hijab. Some find the gender-confused man and the bald woman repulsive. Sephora is a make-up company, and should showcase actual objective beauty instead of subjectively pushing what they think "beauty" is. Also, the narrator encourages viewers to live "our truth," thus promoting the leftist relativist belief in multiple "truths" rather than the truth.
Skittles 2019 Mostly goofy, until the end, when the commercial notifies its audience that Skittles has removed their own rainbow in honor of LGBT "pride", thus kowtowing to the LGBT agenda.
Tiffany & Co. 2019 The luxury jewelry and specialty retailer shoehorned the homosexual agenda, and its support for it, into its TV/YouTube commercial for one of its fragrances by placing several brief clips of two men kissing into the ad. On the YouTube video's comment section, any criticism of the video and its pushing of the homosexual agenda has been childishly attacked by liberal fans of the video, while YouTube has been quick to delete critical comments without legitimate justification under bogus "hate speech" claims (as legitimate criticism of homosexuality and the homosexual agenda is not "hate speech").
Daisy Lyndon B. Johnson campaign 1964 This political ad featured a little girl counting petals as she's taking them off of a daisy flower, only for her voice to be replaced by a nuclear launch countdown announcement. It then zooms into her eye as it shows a nuclear bomb going off while Lyndon B. Johnson's voice is heard stating these are the stakes and that we must either love each other or die (thus obviously implying that voting for his opponent Barry Goldwater is a vote for nuclear war) before requesting that the people vote for Johnson on November 3. The ad is especially infamous as being the first negative political ad and credited to Johnson's win.
Careful Hillary Clinton campaign. 2016 Made by George Lucas and based largely on the Daisy ad noted above, and aimed directly at voters in Ohio, it opens up with a nuclear explosion as well as a narrator stating that a nuclear bomb is capable of slaughtering over a million people, and stating that that number compares to the populace of Columbus, Ohio. It then cuts to a clip of MSNBC commentator Chris Matthews interviewing Donald Trump on Hardball, where he stated to Trump that "A guy running for president of the United States talking of maybe using nuclear weapons… Nobody wants to hear that from an American president.", with Trump bluntly asking "Then why are we making them? Why do we make them?", with the last question echoing as another bomb goes off with the obvious attempt at trying to scare voters into thinking he'll jump-start a nuclear war, with text saying "Be careful who you vote for."