Essay: The evolutionist and atheist Oxyaena offers a lame reply to Conservapedia's challenge

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As can be seen below, the evolutionist and atheist Oxyaena offers a pathetically lame reply to Conservapedia's challenge that was easily and thoroughly crushed like an aluminum can.

Dear Oxyaea,

At an atheist/agnostic wiki, I see that you decided to reply to my challenge given at My challenge to the evolutionist and atheist Oxyaea.

Below I will will first let readers see my challenge and then your reply. Then, I will give a brief reply to your response before resuming taking a break from editing Conservapedia.

My challenge to Oxyaea which was posted on Conservapedia main page

Silver-gauntlet-no-splash-md.png

Conservapedia throws down the gauntlet and issues a challenge to the evolutionist and atheist Oxyaena: Given enough time, could this happen?

My challenge to Oxyaea in its original form

A message to the evolutionist and atheist Oxyaena

Oxyaena, you wrote: "On long enough time scales anything can happen...".[1]

Please read these two articles: Atheism and fertility rates and Desecularization

I am assuming you believe this could happen: Given the much higher birth rates of Christian fundamentalists and the adherents of other fundamentalist Abrahamic religions, the sub-replacement level of fertility of atheists and the fact the secularization rates of France and Protestant Europe are now zero, that given enough time, atheists could be a very much smaller portion of the global population and the religious could inherit the earth. In addition, could feminist atheism, which your wiki promotes, help cause this to happen?

By the way, please read these three articles:


"It will be a century or more before the world completes its demographic transition. There is still too much smoke in the air for us to pick out the peaks and valleys of the emerging social order. This much seems certain: without a new [secular liberal] ideology to inspire social cohesion, fundamentalism cannot be stopped. The religious shall inherit the earth." - Professor Eric Kaufmann[2] See also: Growth of religious fundamentalism

Full steam ahead Bible believers and creationists! See: Acceleration of 21st century desecularization

Oxyaea's response to my challenge

Below is Oxyaea's acceptance/response to my challenge:

"I accept your challenge. First and foremost, fertility rates don't have anything to do with religion per se, choosing one's religion or lack thereof is a choice, a personal one, and while what religion your parents were is an important factor in determining the religion you grow up with and might ultimately believe in, it is not the only, or even the foremost, one. Other factors like education, personal interest, disillusionment with the status quo, and others affect one's personal belief system. Now we move on to my second and last point, if atheist fertility rates are decreasing as you imply, how come more Americans are now irreligious than ever before in history? Fully a quarter of Americans identify as being of "no religion," the so-called "nones," and this is only expected to increase in the following decades. Why is that? Could it be the will of God? Could the atheist-agnostic wager be true, rather than Pascal's Wager? Maybe... — Oxyaena Harass 21:41, 19 April 2019 (UTC)"

My reply to Oxyaea response to my challenge

A few points:

Map of East Asia.

1. First, most atheist reside in East Asia and not the United States (see: Asian atheism and Atheist population and Global atheism and American atheism). Secular Europe has the second most portion of atheists (see: Secular Europe and Atheist population and Global atheism).

In China, Christianity is seeing explosive growth (see: East Asia and global desecularization and Growth of Christianity in China.

There is sound scholarship that Europe will see desecularization in the 21st century (see: European desecularization in the 21st century) and we already see the beginnings of it in Eastern/Central Europe and Britain (see: Central and Eastern Europe and desecularization and British atheism).

The demographic and irreligion/religion/politics scholar Eric Kaufmann (who is an agnostic), who to my knowledge is the only contemporary scholar to write an entire book on the future of irreligion/religion in the 21st century (See: Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?: Demography and Politics in the 21st Century, Profile Books, 2010), cites compelling facts/trends indicating the religious will inherit the earth. He also wrote a paper on this matter at Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?: Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century by Eric Kaufmann, Belfer Center, Harvard University/Birkbeck College, University of London

Atheism is in decline worldwide, with the number of atheists falling from 4.5% of the world's population in 1970 to 2.0% in 2010 and projected to drop to 1.8% by 2020.[3] See: Global atheism

2) Since 1970, the percentage of the world's population claiming to be atheists has fallen and this trend appears to be continuing (see: Global atheism statistics).

On December 23, 2012, Kaufmann wrote about the subject of global desecularization:

I argue that 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious.

On the other hand, the secular West and East Asia has very low fertility and a rapidly aging population... In the coming decades, the developed world's demand for workers to pay its pensions and work in its service sector will soar alongside the booming supply of young people in the third world. Ergo, we can expect significant immigration to the secular West which will import religious revival on the back of ethnic change. In addition, those with religious beliefs tend to have higher birth rates than the secular population, with fundamentalists having far larger families. The epicentre of these trends will be in immigration gateway cities like New York (a third white), Amsterdam (half Dutch), Los Angeles (28% white), and London, 45% white British. [4]

At a conference Kaufmann said of religious demographic projections concerning the 21st century:

Part of the reason I think demography is very important, at least if we are going to speak about the future, is that it is the most predictable of the social sciences.

...if you look at a population and its age structure now. You can tell a lot about the future. ...So by looking at the relative age structure of different populations you can already say a lot about the future...

...Religious fundamentalism is going to be on the increase in the future and not just out there in the developing world..., but in the developed world as well.[5]

Kaufmann wrote in his academic paper Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?: Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century

Today, values play a more important role in fertility behaviour, throwing the contrast between religious pronatalism and secular low-fertility individualism into relief. Over several generations, this process can lead to significant social and political changes. Early Christianity’s exponential rise during its gestation period from 30 to 300 A.D. has been traced to its superior demography (fertility, mortality and female sex ratio), which maintained a rate of growth similar to contemporary Mormonism: 40 percent per decade. For Christians, this led to a jump from 40 converts to 6 million inside three centuries. (Stark 1996) Christianity became the religion of an empire and a continent. In the United States, conservative sects increased their share of white Protestantism from roughly a third to two-thirds during the twentieth century – largely on the back of higher fertility. On the other hand, sects like the Shakers and Cathars, which permitted entry only through conversion, rapidly faded from the scene. Demographic religious revival is a medium and long-term phenomenon, but awareness of shifting population composition can lead to political soul-searching and instability well before the full impact of demographic change takes place. This is clear in ethnically-tense societies like Israel, Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Lebanon, Cote D’Ivoire or Assam.[6]

3) As far as the "Nones"/"no religion" individuals in the United States, the vast majority of them are not atheists.

Although some American atheists like to claim the unaffiliated (unaffiliated with organized religion), "nones" or "no religion" on religious surveys as one of their own, according to Pew in 2017, 72% of the "Nones" believe in God, a higher power, or spiritual force.[7]

The atheist Vlad Chituc wrote at the University of Southern California's Religious Dispatches concerning David Silverman, the former ex-president of the American Atheists:

This leads Silverman to make some wildly inaccurate claims. He argues that more than half of Jews and three-quarters of the rapidly growing religiously unaffiliated are atheists. But according to Pew, only 17% of Jews and 33% of the “nones” say they don’t believe in God. If you want to count the “don’t knows” or “others,” that gets to about 20% and 40%, respectively, at best.

These are not small discrepancies, and based on these falsely inflated statistics, Silverman makes startlingly inaccurate claims, like that there are 80 million atheists in the U.S., a full 26% of the country....To make things frustratingly worse, other atheists have been calling Silverman out for falsely inflating the number of atheists for more than four years. And last year, I specifically asked Silverman if he would stop reporting the stats on “nones” as being representative of atheism, and he told me he would. Yet here we are.[8]

In addition, consider this information in relation to the nones/"no religion"/religiously unaffiliated as far as survey data that relates to something Baylor University reported: "Because traditional surveys do not provide categories that adequately describe those who attend nondenominational congregations, their members often check “unaffiliated” in typical surveys and questionnaires...[9]

The atheist Georgetown University professor Jacques Berlinerblau declared concerning American atheists attempting to falsely inflate their numbers:

American atheist movements, though fancying themselves a lion, are more like the gimpy little zebra crossing the river full of crocs. In terms of both political gains and popular appeal, nonbelievers in the United States have little to show. They are encircled by cunning, swarming [religious] Revivalist adversaries who know how to play the atheist card. The gimpy zebra remark was a little goofing on this over-the-top chest-thumping that emerges from Movement Atheists. They wildly overestimate their numbers. They tend to overestimate the efficacy of their activism. They underestimate how disciplined and organized their adversaries in the religious right are, too. They fail to recognize that mocking religious people in public is entirely inimical to the goals they wish to achieve."[10]

4) The percentage of "Nones" in the world is expected to fall.

According to the Pew Research Forum:

These projections, which take into account demographic factors such as fertility, age composition and life expectancy, forecast that people with no religion will make up about 13% of the world’s population in 2050, down from roughly 16% as of 2010.

This is largely attributable to the fact that religious “nones” are, on average, older and have fewer children than people who are affiliated with a religion...

China, with its large population and lack of reliable data on religious switching, is something of a wild card when it comes to the future of world religion. This is especially true for the religiously unaffiliated population; more than half of the world’s people who do not identify with any religion live in China (roughly 700 million).

Some experts believe the Christian population in China is rising while the religiously unaffiliated population is falling. If this is true – and the trend continues – religious “nones” could decline as a share of the world’s population even more than the Pew Research Center study projects.[11]

5) As far as the United States and American atheism, consider these facts:

The atheist Georgetown professor Jacques Berlinerblau likens the strength of the American atheist movement to a "gimpy little zebra".[12]

According to the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS), the number of atheists and agnostics in the United States has remained relatively stable in the past 23 years. In 2014, 3% of Americans identified as atheists, and 5% identified as agnostics.[13] In 1991, 2% of Americans identified as atheist, and 4% identified as agnostic.[14]

In June 2016, American Interest reported:

First of all, religious belief is still very powerful and widespread, and there is nothing inevitable about its decline. In fact, the proportion of people who say they believe in God actually ticked modestly upward, from 86 percent to 89 percent, since Gallup last asked the question in 2014.[15]

Most American atheists are white (see: Western atheism and race). The percentage of whites in the United States if falling and whites as a whole now have sub-replacement levels of fertility in the Unites States (see: Fewer Births Than Deaths Among Whites in Majority of U.S. States, New York Times, 2018). There is a growth of Hispanic Catholics/evangelicals in the USA and there are even secular scholars who agree that this will cause secularization in the United States to plateau before 2043 (see: United States, irreligion vs. religion and demographics). American Latinos are hard ground for the expansion of atheism (see: Atheism and Latino Americans).

As far as atheist organizations and fundraising, in 2017, the atheist activist Lee Moore declared about American atheist organizations:

If you look at the major atheist groups right now, like the national groups, the ones that are doing the real activist work... They are not bringing in the kind of donations they used to. Most of them are starved for cash. They're downsizing left and right. Because people aren't just giving like they used to. And I talked to a lot of the major donors out there and they said, "Well, we're kind of tired of seeing the atheist community just fight amongst itself and not really get anything done. We'd rather not give money if we don't think it's going to go somewhere."[16]

Dr. Steve Turley wrote about American/European atheism/agnosticism and religious fundamentalism:

According to University of London scholar Eric Kaufmann’s detailed study on global demographic trends, we are in the early stages of nothing less than a demographic revolution. In Kaufmann’s words, "religious fundamentalists are on course to take over the world." There is a significant demographic deficit between secularists and conservative religionists. For example, in the U.S., while self-identified non-religionist women averaged only 1.5 children per couple in 2002, conservative evangelical women averaged 2.5 children, representing a 28 percent fertility edge. Kaufmann notes that this demographic deficit has dramatic effects over time. In a population evenly divided, these numbers indicate that conservative evangelicals would increase from 50 to 62.5 percent of the population in a single generation. In two generations, their number would increase to 73.5 percent, and over the course of 200 years, they would represent 99.4 percent. The Amish and Mormons provide contemporary illustrations of the compound effect of endogamous growth. The Amish double in population every twenty years, and projections have the Amish numbering over a million in the U.S. and Canada in just a few decades. Since 1830, Mormon growth has averaged 40 percent per decade, which means that by 2080, there may be as many as 267 million Mormons in the world, making them by 2100 anywhere from one to six percent of the world’s population.

In Europe, immigration is making the continent more religiously conservative, not less; in fact, London and Paris are some of the most religiously dense areas within their respective populations. In Britain, for example, Ultra-Orthodox or Haredi Jews constitute only 17 percent of the Jewish population but account for 75 percent of Jewish births. And in Israel, Haredi schoolchildren have gone from comprising a few percent to nearly a third of all Jewish pupils in a matter of five decades, and are poised to represent the majority of the Jewish population by 2050. Since 1970, charismatic Christians in Europe have expanded steadily at a rate of 4 percent per year, in step with Muslim growth. Currently, Laestadian Lutherans in Finland and Holland’s Orthodox Calvinists have a fertility advantage over their wider secular populations of 4:1 and 2:1 respectively.

In contrast, Kaufmann’s data projects that secularists, who consistently exemplify a low fertility rate of around 1.5 (significantly below the replacement level of 2.1), will begin a steady decline after 2030 to a mere 14 to 15 percent of the American population. Similar projections apply to Europe as well. Kaufmann thus appears to have identified what he calls "the soft underbelly of secularism," namely, demography. This is because secular liberalism entails its own “demographic contradiction,” the affirmation of the sovereign individual devoid of the restraints of classical moral structures necessitates the freedom not to reproduce. The link between sex and procreation having been broken, modernist reproduction translates into mere personal preference. It thus turns out that the radical individualism so celebrated and revered by contemporary secular propagandists is in fact the agent by which their ideology implodes.[17]

The atheist PZ Myers declared on September 27, 2014, "I will make a prediction, right here and now.... The number of people identifying as atheists will stagnate or even shrink..."[18] See: Desecularization and Decline of global atheism

The morale of the atheist movement in the United States and the Western World is low. Numerous atheists have declared that the "atheist movement is dead" or that it is dying (see: Decline of the atheist movement)[19]

Eric Kaufmann, wrote in 2010:

Worldwide, the march of religion can probably only be reversed by a renewed, self-aware secularism. Today, it appears exhausted and lacking in confidence... Secularism's greatest triumphs owe less to science than to popular social movements like nationalism, socialism and 1960s anarchist-liberalism. Ironically, secularism's demographic deficit means that it will probably only succeed in the twenty-first century if it can create a secular form of 'religious' enthusiasm.[20]

Questions for Oxyaena

Below are some questions for Oxyaena.

I wrote in my challenge: "I am assuming you believe this could happen: Given the much higher birth rates of Christian fundamentalists and the adherents of other fundamentalist Abrahamic religions, the sub-replacement level of fertility of atheists and the fact the secularization rates of France and Protestant Europe are now zero, that given enough time, atheists could be a very much smaller portion of the global population and the religious could inherit the earth. In addition, could feminist atheism, which your wiki promotes, help cause this to happen?"

1. Do atheists have sub-replacement levels of births? Yes or no? See: Atheism and fertility rates

2. According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, 2% of the world's population self-identifies as atheist and the average annual global change for atheism from 2000 to 2010 was −0.17%.[21]

Does Encyclopedia Britannica and various scholars indicate the percentage of atheists in the world has been shrinking in the world? Yes or no? See: Global atheism statistics

Can you show me any scholarship or survey data within the last 2 years which indicates the percentage of atheists is increasing in the world? Yes or no? Can you show me you show me any scholarship or survey data within the last 5 years which indicates the percentage of atheists is increasing in the world? Yes or no?

Can you show me any scholarship or survey data within the last 2 years which indicates the percentage of atheists is staying the same in world? Yes or no? Can you show me you show me any scholarship or survey data within the last 5 years which indicates the percentage of atheists is staying the same in the world? Yes or no?

3. Is religious fundamentalism increasing in the world? Yes or no? See: Growth of religious fundamentalism

4. Please reply to the below information and questions concerning the secularization thesis.

Conservative Protestants have relatively high fertility rates.[22] (Picture: Protestant church pulpit in Europe)

In 2011, a paper was published entitled The End of Secularization in Europe?: A Socio-Demographic Perspective. The authors of the paper were: Eric Kaufmann - Birkbeck College, University of London; Anne Goujon - World Population Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA); Vegard Skirbekk World Population Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA).[23]

An excerpt from the paper by Kaufmann, Goujon and Skirbekk:

Conservative Protestants, a much larger group than the Mormons, also benefit from relatively high fertility. Hout et al. (2001) find that three-quarters of the growth of conservative Protestant denominations against their liberal counterparts is due to fertility advantage rather than conversion.

In Europe, there has been less attention paid to fertility differences between denominations. However, several studies have discovered that immigrants to Europe tend to be more religious than the host population and — especially if Muslim—tend to retain their religiosity (Van Tubergen 2006). Though some indicators point to modest religious decline toward the host society mean, other trends suggest that immigrants become more, rather than less, religious the longer they reside in the host society (Van Tubergen 2007). All of which indicates that religious decline may fail at the aggregate level even if it is occurring at the individual level (Kaufmann 2006, 2010). This article thereby investigates the hypothesis that a combination of higher religious fertility, immigration, and slowing rates of religious apostasy will eventually produce a reversal in the decline of the religious population of Western Europe.[24]

What are the implications of religious immigrants who are resistant to secularization and having higher birth rates than the native population coming into a country which is less religious?

The ex-atheist Alister McGrath points out that many atheists/agnostics were angry that the secularization thesis failed because religion was "supposed to" disappear.[25]

In April 2010, Eric Kaufmann, who is an agnostic, declared "the rate of secularisation has flattened to zero in most of Protestant Europe and France."[26]

Do you have any reason to doubt Kaufmann's statement? If Kaufmann is correct, what are the implications in terms of the secularization thesis?

Has France and Europe seen a large increase in the number of religious immigrants? Is it likely that these immigrants have higher fertility rates than the native citizens and atheists (see: Atheism and fertility rates)?

By the way, on July 12, 2012, the Christian Science Monitor reported:

French scholars say, evangelicalism is likely the fastest-growing religion in France – defying all stereotypes about Europe’s most secular nation...

Daniel Liechti, vice-president of the French National Evangelical Council, found that since 1970, a new evangelical church has opened in France every 10 days. The number of churches increased from 769 to 2,068 last year.[27]

On December 2018, The Times indicated: "The number of atheists in Britain has fallen in the past year, according to a survey suggesting that more people are attending church, albeit irregularly."[28]

The Guardian published an article in 2017 entitled Nearly 50% are of no religion – but has UK hit ‘peak secular’? which declared:

But, Bullivant told the Observer that the “growth of no religion may have stalled”. After consistent decline, in the past few years the proportion of nones appears to have stabilised. “Younger people tend to be more non-religious, so you’d expect it to keep going – but it hasn’t. The steady growth of non-Christian religions is a contributing factor, but I wonder if everyone who is going to give up their Anglican affiliation has done so by now? We’ve seen a vast shedding of nominal Christianity, and perhaps it’s now down to its hardcore.[29]

Conatus News reported in 2017:

Church of England worshippers increase 0.8 per cent since 2009. The number of non-religious people falls from 50.65% to 48.6%

Rise in Church of England worshippers likely due to resurgence in patriotism and pride in Christianity, a report has found

According to a new report, for every person brought up in a non-religious household who becomes a churchgoer, 26 people raised as Christians now identify as non-believers.

The study, which is based on an analysis of the British Social Attitudes Survey and the European Social Survey, reported that the proportion of non-religious in the UK hit a high of 50.6 per cent in 2009. However, it has been decreasing ever since and hit 48.6 per cent in 2015.

However, the proportion of those who identify as Church of England worshippers has seen a slight increased from 16.3 per cent in 2009 to 17.1 per cent in 2015.[30]

As far as the recent developments in Britain/UK in terms of religion/irreligion, what are the implications in terms of the secularization thesis?

Given that most atheists are likely East Asians and China is experiencing an explosive growth of Christianity amidst growing economic development and industrialization in China on the whole up until recently (poverty rate has been slashed in recent years), what are the implications of this upon the secularization thesis? See: East Asia and global desecularization

In 2012, a Georgetown University study was published indicating that about 30 percent of those who grow up in an atheist household in the United States remain atheists as adults.[31]

In 2012, a Georgetown University study was published indicating that in the United States only about 30 percent of those who grow up in an atheist household remain atheists as adults.[32] According to Dr. Mark Gray, "of those raised as atheists, 30% are now affiliated with a Protestant denomination, 10% are Catholic, 2% are Jewish, 1% are Mormon, and 1% are Pagan."[33] See also: Atheism and children

Theodore Beale wrote about the Pew Research Forum's examination data involving individuals raised as atheists:

...the example of various former atheists such as C.S. Lewis and Anthony Flew indicates that atheism is nothing more than a transitive state for many individuals...

The retention rate is even worse for the full blown atheist population. 60% of those raised atheist abandon atheism; 0.5% of the population was raised atheist and 0.3% of it left atheism. And while 1.4% of the population became atheist, the fact that nearly all of the nation is not atheist means that the non-atheist population has a retention rate of 98.6%, which is nearly 2.5 times better than the atheist retention rate of 40%. Therefore, the perceived rapid growth of atheism is nothing more than an artifact of the atheist population's statistical insignificance. Even the dying Episcopalian church has a better retention rate than atheism...[34]

As far as the Georgetown University study data and the data that Vox Day gave, what are the implications in terms of the secularization thesis?

5. I am going to repeat my original challenge with some bolding for emphasis "I am assuming you believe this could happen: Given the much higher birth rates of Christian fundamentalists and the adherents of other fundamentalist Abrahamic religions, the sub-replacement level of fertility of atheists and the fact the secularization rates of France and Protestant Europe are now zero, that given enough time, atheists could be a very much smaller portion of the global population and the religious could inherit the earth. In addition, could feminist atheism, which your wiki promotes, help cause this to happen?"

So could this happen given enough time? Is is possible? If not, why not? At least in my estimation, you dodged this central question.

Is there evidence that the secularization thesis is invalid? If not, why not? If so, how would this affect my challenge to you?

Is there evidence that some religious fundamentalist populations are growing at an increasing rate (See Dr. Turley's commentary above)? If so, what are the implications of this in terms of the secularization thesis and my challenge to you?

6. Does feminism lower birth rates? Yes or no?

Please read this article: Low Birth Rates Parallel Not Just The Economy, But Also Waves Of Feminism

Negative Population Growth (NPG) declared in an article entitled The Rise in Feminism and Its Impact on Population Growth:

Rubenstein wraps up his study with the statement: “Three generations of U.S. mothers –suffragettes, Baby-boomers and Me-too millennials – are profiled in this paper. While the policy issues differ, the overarching goals of each generation are similar: these women want empowerment. They want the power to control their fertility, the power to raise healthy children, and the power to compete with men in the labor market. Population reduction is never their explicit goal, yet with each of these feminist waves fertility rates declined amidst a strong economy.”[35]

If feminism does lower birth rates, could feminist atheism, which your wiki promotes, help cause the world to become desecularized?

Over 60% of Czech citizens can be identified as irreligious.[36][37] In 2012, the Czech Republic had 1.45 births per woman. A societal replacement level of births is 2.1 births per woman. See: Atheism and fertility rates

7) You wrote: "First and foremost, fertility rates don't have anything to do with religion per se, choosing one's religion or lack thereof is a choice, a personal one, and while what religion your parents were is an important factor in determining the religion you grow up with and might ultimately believe in, it is not the only, or even the foremost, one. Other factors like education, personal interest, disillusionment with the status quo, and others affect one's personal belief system."

First, read this article in relation to your statements on people's choice of which worldview they choose to adopt: Links between childhood religious upbringing and current religious identity.

Does the parents view of religion often play a very big role in the worldview of the children - especially if the parents have the same religion?

Next, in the United States, religion is positively correlated to education; a scholarly study published in an academic journal titled the Review of Religious Research demonstrated that increased education is correlated with belief in God and that "education positively affects religious participation, devotional activities, and emphasizing the importance of religion in daily life."[38][39][40][41]

Regardless, in the USA, College Closings suggest America’s college bubble may be bursting. In addition, in the USA, there are secular leftist public schools seeing a big drop in attendance while Christian conservative colleges are seeing surges in attendance (see: Colleges Lose Students while Conservative Colleges Surge!!!).

In Hungary, nationalist, pro-Christian schools are being put in place and gender studies courses are banned (and there are areas in Hungary where only religious schools exist).[42] See:Viktor Orban’s Hungary Establishes a New Nationalist School System!!!. We see similar things happening in other European countries like Poland, country of Georgia, etc.[43][44] If countries become more desecularized in the future, could this not happen in other countries? Is there evidence, that right-wing, nationalism sweeping Europe will result in schools becoming less secular in Europe?[45]

As far as "disillusionment with the status quo" causing people to be religious/irreligious, consider the information below.

Excerpt from the academic paper entitled The Changing Face of Global Christianity by Dr. Todd Johnson & Sandra S. Kim:

As Latourette’s Great Century was coming to a close, churches outside of Europe and the Americas that took root in the 19th century grew rapidly in the 20th century.10 Africa, in particular, led this transformation growing from only 10 million Christians in 1900 to 360 million by AD 2000. Given current trends, there could be over 600 million Christians in Africa by 2025. Shortly after 1980, Christians in the South outnumbered those in the North for the first time in 1,000 years. In 1900 over 80% of all Christians lived in Europe and Northern America, however, by 2005 this proportion had fallen to under 40% and will likely fall below 30% before 2050. Projections for the future show that the Christian churches of the Global South (Africa, Asia, Latin America and Oceania) will likely continue to acquire an increasing percentage of global Christianity...

Another daily reality for Southern Christians is poverty. Much of the global South deals with serious issues of poverty and a lack of access to proper health care. Countries that have been hardest hit by AIDS, such as Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Swaziland, are also countries where Christianity is flourishing. Without access to the necessary medical care, accounts of healing and exorcism found in the Bible are taken more seriously. The work of the Holy Spirit exhibited in the ministry of signs and miracles of healing and deliverance from demonic powers has exploded in the ministry of Pentecostal/Charismatic churches in the global South. David Smith describes these churches as “overwhelmingly charismatic and conservative in character, reading the New Testament in ways that seem puzzlingly literal to their friends in the North,” and as “largely made up of poor people who in many cases live on the very edge of existence.” Thus the growth of Christianity in poorer regions implies not only an alternative reading of the Bible, but a different experience of the Bible.[46]

The atheist and Harvard University historian Niall Ferguson declared: "Through a mixture of hard work and thrift the Protestant societies of the North and West Atlantic achieved the most rapid economic growth in history."[47]

Paul Adams wrote in his article The Rise of Evangelicalism in Mexico:

But with a country shadowed by the underground totalitarianism of the Mexican Drug Cartel and other drug-related violence which has killed over 50,000 people over the past five years, the visit was a bittersweet one...

Local pastor Horacio Lopez asserted, “Our descendants say before the evangelicals arrived the town was in a miserable state.” The town has generally prohibited the selling of alcohol for religious reasons, and has found itself in a much more sobering and content mood....

Mexico has found itself becoming more poor, frustrated, and scared while it continues to show no signs of economical or political improvement. With its government inadequately supporting the social structure, the people are beginning to look elsewhere for salvation.[48]

The atheist and Harvard University historian Niall Ferguson declared: "Through a mixture of hard work and thrift the Protestant societies of the North and West Atlantic achieved the most rapid economic growth in history."[49]

The article The Surprising Discovery About Those Colonialist, Proselytizing Missionaries published in Christianity Today notes:

In his fifth year of graduate school, Woodberry created a statistical model that could test the connection between missionary work and the health of nations. He and a few research assistants spent two years coding data and refining their methods. They hoped to compute the lasting effect of missionaries, on average, worldwide...

One morning, in a windowless, dusty computer lab lit by fluorescent bulbs, Woodberry ran the first big test. After he finished prepping the statistical program on his computer, he clicked "Enter" and then leaned forward to read the results.

"I was shocked," says Woodberry. "It was like an atomic bomb. The impact of missions on global democracy was huge. I kept adding variables to the model—factors that people had been studying and writing about for the past 40 years—and they all got wiped out. It was amazing. I knew, then, I was on to something really important."

Woodberry already had historical proof that missionaries had educated women and the poor, promoted widespread printing, led nationalist movements that empowered ordinary citizens, and fueled other key elements of democracy. Now the statistics were backing it up: Missionaries weren't just part of the picture. They were central to it...

Areas where Protestant missionaries had a significant presence in the past are on average more economically developed today, with comparatively better health, lower infant mortality, lower corruption, greater literacy, higher educational attainment (especially for women), and more robust membership in nongovernmental associations.

In short: Want a blossoming democracy today? The solution is simple—if you have a time machine: Send a 19th-century missionary."[50]

For more information, please see: Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism and Protestant cultural legacies

Request for Oxyaena

If you attempt to rebut this essay, please source the claims you make.

Addendum to this essay

See also

Essays:

References

  1. IMPROBABLE THINGS HAPPEN by Oxyaena
  2. The Stork Theory By Allan C. Carlson, February 28, 2018
  3. Global Study: Atheists in Decline, Only 1.8% of World Population by 2020
  4. 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious, Tuesday, April 30, 2013
  5. Eric Kaufmann - Religion, Demography and Politics in the 21st Century
  6. Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?: Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century by Eric Kaufmann, Belfer Center, Harvard University/Birkbeck College, University of London (PDF)
  7. Key findings about Americans' belief in God. Pew Research Center (April 25, 2018). “In recent years, the share of American adults who do not affiliate with a religious group has risen dramatically. In spite of this trend, the overwhelming majority of Americans, including a majority of the religiously unaffiliated – those who describe themselves, religiously, as atheists, agnostics or “nothing in particular” – say they believe in God or a higher power, according a new Pew Research Center survey conducted in December of 2017....Finally, among those who describe themselves as religiously unaffiliated – also known as “nones” – 72% say they believe in a higher power of some kind.”
  8. How Not To Defend Atheism by Vlad Chituc, University of Southern California's Religious Dispatches, 2015
  9. THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT EVANGELICALISM
  10. Professor Jacques Berlinerblau tells atheists: Stop whining!, Christian Century, Sep 14, 2012 by Kimberly Winston
  11. Why people with no religion are projected to decline as a share of the world’s population, Pew Forum
  12. Professor Jacques Berlinerblau tells atheists: Stop whining!, Christian Century, Sep 14, 2012 by Kimberly Winston
  13. Hout, Michael; Smith, Tom (March 2015). "Fewer Americans Affiliate with Organized Religions, Belief and Practice Unchanged: Key Findings from the 2014 General Social Survey" (PDF). General Social Survey. NORC
  14. Hout, Michael; Smith, Tom (March 2015). "Fewer Americans Affiliate with Organized Religions, Belief and Practice Unchanged: Key Findings from the 2014 General Social Survey" (PDF). General Social Survey. NORC
  15. Atheism is Rising, But…, American Interest
  16. Lee Moore and Steve Shives Talk About the Future of the Atheist Movement, - video quote comes 21 minutes and 13 seconds into the video
  17. (source: Text below the YouTube video Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth and the text was written by Dr. Steven Turley).
  18. The Atheist Disillusionment by PZ Myers, September 27, 2014
  19. Shall the religious inherit the earth? - Eric Kaufmann
  20. Religion: Year in Review 2010: Worldwide Adherents of All Religions. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc.. Retrieved on 2013-11-21.
  21. Religious immigrants will alter the religious landscape of Europe
  22. Religious immigrants will alter the religious landscape of Europe
  23. Religious immigrants will alter the religious landscape of Europe
  24. 'Why God Won't Go Away' by Alister McGrath
  25. Shall the religious inherit the earth? by Eric Kaufmann
  26. In a France suspicious of religion, evangelicalism's message strikes a chord
  27. Atheism is down as UK gets spiritual, The Times, December 2018
  28. Nearly 50% are of no religion – but has UK hit ‘peak secular’?, The Guardian, 2017
  29. British Patriotism Sees Number of Anglicans Rise and the Non-Religious Fall, Conatus News , 2017
  30. Nazworth, Nap (July 11, 2012). "Study: atheists have lowest 'retention rate' compared to religious groups". christianpost.com.
  31. Study: Atheists Have Lowest 'Retention Rate' Compared to Religious Groups
  32. Study: Atheists Have Lowest 'Retention Rate' Compared to Religious Groups
  33. Another atheist myth
  34. The Rise in Feminism and Its Impact on Population Growth, National Public Radio (NPR)
  35. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns" (PDF)
  36. "Are Czechs the least religious of all? | Dana Hamplova | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk".
  37. Schwadel, Philip (2011). The Effects of Education on Americans’ Religious Practices, Beliefs, and Affiliations. DOI:10.1007/s13644-011-0007-4. “education positively affects religious participation, devotional activities, and emphasizing the importance of religion in daily life; (3) education positively affects switching religious affiliations, particularly to a mainline Protestant denomination, but not disaffiliation; (4) education is positively associated with questioning the role of religion in secular society but not with support for curbing the public opinions of religious leaders; and (5) the effects of education on religious beliefs and participation vary across religious traditions. Education does influence Americans’ religious beliefs and activities, but the effects of education on religion are complex.” 
  38. Jim Kavanagh (11 August 2011). Study: More educated tend to be more religious, by some measures. CNN. ““With more years of education, you aren’t relatively more likely to say, ‘I don’t believe in God,’” he said. “But you are relatively more likely to say, ‘I believe in a higher power.’””
  39. The more education people receive, the more religious they become?. Daily Mail (12 August 2011). “By analyzing data from a large national survey, sociologist Philip Schwadel of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln found that people tend to become more religious - by certain definitions - as they further their education. The survey also qualified what concept of God or a 'higher power' individuals held, as well as whether they had any doubts. Mr Schwadel said that: 'With more years of education, you aren’t relatively more likely to say, "I don’t believe in God," but you are relatively more likely to say, "I believe in a higher power."'”
  40. More is More When it Comes to Education and Religion, Study Says. Christian Post (13 August 2011). “Sociologist Philip Schwadel from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) studied this phenomenon. He discovered that people today tend to become more religious as they further their education.”
  41. Viktor Orban’s Hungary Establishes a New Nationalist School System!!!
  42. Viktor Orban’s Hungary Establishes a New Nationalist School System!!!
  43. Poland and education
  44. Viktor Orban’s Hungary Establishes a New Nationalist School System!!!
  45. Why a literal reading of the Genesis is surging in the world. Why a a literal reading of the Genesis will increase in the Western World
  46. The Protestant Work Ethic: Alive & Well…In China By Hugh Whelchel on September 24, 2012
  47. The Rise Of Evangelicalism In Mexico by Paul Adams
  48. The Protestant Work Ethic: Alive & Well…In China By Hugh Whelchel on September 24, 2012
  49. Christianity Today, The Surprising Discovery About Those Colonialist, Proselytizing Missionaries, January 8, 2014