Difference between revisions of "Exact sciences"

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The '''exact sciences''' actually measure what they study, as opposed to the "fuzzy subjects" which mostly engage in uninformed speculation. Evolution is a "fuzzy subject" subject because it cannot be witnessed, but rather is based on secular guesses using existing evidence. Needless to say, exact sciences are far more accurate than fuzzy subjects.
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An '''exact science''' constructs [[Scientific theory|theories]] making predictions which can be verified or falsified using quantitative and rigorous measurements. Usually the natural sciences are considered to be exact sciences, while social sciences are considered to be non-quantifiable. More colloquial terms going among similar lines are 'hard science' and 'soft science'. It is important to note that the existence of a theory  which is non quantifiable right now in any science, does not imply this science to be not exact. Several important theories existed for long times until [[experiment]]s (or measurements) could be designed to test them. Some sciences have or had components of hard and soft sciences. Sometimes new measurement methods and technologies can change a soft science into a hard one (e.g. medical science over the last few hundred years).  
  
==Topics==
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Unlike speculations masquerading as science and based on persuasion rather than [[proof]], exact science attempts to formulate true statements about the environment, without philosophical or intuitive bias.<ref>{{cite book
*[[mathematics]] (excepting non-constructive mathematics, like [[proof by contradiction]])<ref>For more discussion, see: [[Conservapedia:Critical Thinking in Math]]</ref>
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|author=Randal Hedtke
*[[astronomy]]
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|title=Secrets of the Sixth Edition
*[[physics]]
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|publisher=Master Books
*[[chemistry]]
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|place=Portland, Oregon
*[[volcanology]]
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|year=2010
*[[seismology]]
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|pages=79
*[[creation science]]
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|isbn=978-0-89051-597-6
*[[baraminology]]
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|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=gvyHquVubDoC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Hedtke+The+secrets+of+the+sixth+edition&source=bl&ots=VQBk7unu95&sig=3-pYZsIj2vzBHgcIbYEpexlVc9s&hl=en&sa=X&ei=FsOGUO2kCIKJ4gS-tYCoBg&redir_esc=y}}</ref>
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Sciences which aim to fulfill the ideal of an exact science and assume [[Naturalism]] are [[mathematics]], natural sciences ([[physics]], [[astronomy]], [[chemistry]], [[biology]]), Geosciences ([[geology]], [[meteorology]] etc...) and engineering science. Sciences which aim to use exact [[scientific method]]s without requiring [[Naturalism]] exist, for example [[creation science]] and [[baraminology]].
  
==Fuzzy subjects==
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Sciences which do seldom aim to be make exact predictions are social sciences, and linguistic sciences. However, in the form of [[statistics]] and simulations exact methods also enter these fields.
*[[evolution]]
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*[[paleontology]]
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*[[linguistics]]
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*[[psychology]]
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*[[meteorology]] (especially [[global warming]])
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*[[astronomy]] (especially [[black holes]], the [[Big Bang]] theory)
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==References==
 
==References==
 
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
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==See also==
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*[[Empirical science]]
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*[[Experimental science]]
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*[[Historical science]]
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*[[Operation science]]
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*[[Origin science]]
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*[[Paleoscience]]
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[[Category:Science]]
 
[[Category:Science]]
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[[Category:Methodology of Science]]
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[[Category:Scientific Disciplines]]

Latest revision as of 09:52, 26 September 2018

An exact science constructs theories making predictions which can be verified or falsified using quantitative and rigorous measurements. Usually the natural sciences are considered to be exact sciences, while social sciences are considered to be non-quantifiable. More colloquial terms going among similar lines are 'hard science' and 'soft science'. It is important to note that the existence of a theory which is non quantifiable right now in any science, does not imply this science to be not exact. Several important theories existed for long times until experiments (or measurements) could be designed to test them. Some sciences have or had components of hard and soft sciences. Sometimes new measurement methods and technologies can change a soft science into a hard one (e.g. medical science over the last few hundred years).

Unlike speculations masquerading as science and based on persuasion rather than proof, exact science attempts to formulate true statements about the environment, without philosophical or intuitive bias.[1] Sciences which aim to fulfill the ideal of an exact science and assume Naturalism are mathematics, natural sciences (physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology), Geosciences (geology, meteorology etc...) and engineering science. Sciences which aim to use exact scientific methods without requiring Naturalism exist, for example creation science and baraminology.

Sciences which do seldom aim to be make exact predictions are social sciences, and linguistic sciences. However, in the form of statistics and simulations exact methods also enter these fields.

References

  1. Randal Hedtke (2010). Secrets of the Sixth Edition. Master Books, 79. ISBN 978-0-89051-597-6. 

See also