Difference between revisions of "Fifth Column"

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A '''fifth column''' is a group of people who rationally and clandestinely tries to undermine a larger group to which it is expected to be loyal. The expression dates from the [[Spanish Civil War]] in 1936 when the Francoist General Mola, whose forces were threatening Madrid, boasted that he had four columns approaching the city and a fifth column within it.
 
A '''fifth column''' is a group of people who rationally and clandestinely tries to undermine a larger group to which it is expected to be loyal. The expression dates from the [[Spanish Civil War]] in 1936 when the Francoist General Mola, whose forces were threatening Madrid, boasted that he had four columns approaching the city and a fifth column within it.
  
During the [[Second World War]], when British citizens were anxious about supposed fifth-columnists in the UK, the artist [[William Heath-Robinson]] produced a series of cartoons about the Sixth Column, patriotic men and women devoted to frustrating the actions of the Fifth Column<ref>http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/walker/exhibitions/heathrobinson/Sixth_column.asp</ref>.
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During the [[Second World War]], when British citizens were anxious about supposed fifth-columnists in the UK, the artist [[William Heath-Robinson]] produced a series of cartoons about the Sixth Column, patriotic men and women devoted to frustrating the actions of the Fifth Column.<ref>http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/walker/exhibitions/heathrobinson/Sixth_column.asp</ref>
  
==See Also==
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==See also==
 
*[[Cabal]]
 
*[[Cabal]]
  
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<references/>
 
<references/>
  
[[category:International Political Terms]]
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[[Category:International Political Terms]]

Revision as of 06:25, 13 July 2016

A fifth column is a group of people who rationally and clandestinely tries to undermine a larger group to which it is expected to be loyal. The expression dates from the Spanish Civil War in 1936 when the Francoist General Mola, whose forces were threatening Madrid, boasted that he had four columns approaching the city and a fifth column within it.

During the Second World War, when British citizens were anxious about supposed fifth-columnists in the UK, the artist William Heath-Robinson produced a series of cartoons about the Sixth Column, patriotic men and women devoted to frustrating the actions of the Fifth Column.[1]

See also

References

  1. http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/walker/exhibitions/heathrobinson/Sixth_column.asp