Difference between revisions of "Graphology"

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(not same as forensic document examination)
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[[Graphology]] is the study and analysis of [[human]] handwriting with the intent of assessing a person's [[psychological]] state. Handwriting experts are technically known as forensic document examiners.
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[[Graphology]] is the study and analysis of [[human]] handwriting with the intent of assessing a person's [[psychological]] state. This is not to be confused with [[forensic document examination]], which involving determining the authenticity of handwriting evidence, and similar tasks.<ref>[http://www.abfde.org/FAQs.html American Board of Forensic Document Examiners - Frequently Asked Questions]</ref>
  
 
Some Graphologists believe details like spacing of words, dotted "i's" and crossed "t's", could reveal unconscious mental functions.  
 
Some Graphologists believe details like spacing of words, dotted "i's" and crossed "t's", could reveal unconscious mental functions.  

Revision as of 06:02, 13 June 2008

Handwriting.jpg

Graphology is the study and analysis of human handwriting with the intent of assessing a person's psychological state. This is not to be confused with forensic document examination, which involving determining the authenticity of handwriting evidence, and similar tasks.[1]

Some Graphologists believe details like spacing of words, dotted "i's" and crossed "t's", could reveal unconscious mental functions.

As an example it is said that: Hillary Clinton is smart and forceful, John McCain is proud but has a volatile temper, and Barack Obama is a diplomat who deals well with different people and situations. [2]

Neuroscientist Barry Beyerstein (1996) considers the majority of the notions of graphologists to be no more than sympathetic magic.

External links

References

  1. ↑ American Board of Forensic Document Examiners - Frequently Asked Questions
  2. ↑ In US election, every (written) word counts Yahoo! news.