Difference between revisions of "Gulf War"

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The '''Persian Gulf War''' was started when [[Iraq]], under [[Saddam Hussein]]'s leadership, invaded [[Kuwait]] on August 2, 1990. The [[United Nations]] commanded Saddam to leave Kuwait but he rejected the idea. After much planning an international force involving the armies and air forces of, among others, the ''United States'', the [[United Kingdom]], [[France]], [[Germany]], [[Canada]] and [[South Korea]] forced Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait on February 28, 1991.
 
The '''Persian Gulf War''' was started when [[Iraq]], under [[Saddam Hussein]]'s leadership, invaded [[Kuwait]] on August 2, 1990. The [[United Nations]] commanded Saddam to leave Kuwait but he rejected the idea. After much planning an international force involving the armies and air forces of, among others, the ''United States'', the [[United Kingdom]], [[France]], [[Germany]], [[Canada]] and [[South Korea]] forced Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait on February 28, 1991.
  
In the lead up to the war, April Glaspie met with Hussein on July 25, 1990, indicating in a conversation that he may have Kuwait claiming that whatever he does to solve his dispute is not within US interests.<ref>https://wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/90BAGHDAD4237_a.html</ref><ref>http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article11376.htm</ref><ref>https://foreignpolicy.com/2011/01/09/wikileaks-april-glaspie-and-saddam-hussein/</ref> Leading up to the first [[Gulf War]], on September 11, 1990, President [[George H.W. Bush]] addressing the United Nations stated: "Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective – a New World Order – can emerge: a new era" thus becoming the first President of the United States of America to openly state and work toward global governance.
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In the lead up to the war, April Glaspie met with Hussein on July 25, 1990, indicating in a conversation that he may have Kuwait claiming that whatever he does to solve his dispute is not within US interests.<ref>https://wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/90BAGHDAD4237_a.html</ref><ref>http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article11376.htm</ref><ref>https://foreignpolicy.com/2011/01/09/wikileaks-april-glaspie-and-saddam-hussein/</ref> Leading up to the first Gulf War, on September 11, 1990, President [[George H.W. Bush]] addressing the United Nations stated: "Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective – a New World Order – can emerge: a new era" thus becoming the first President of the United States of America to openly state and work toward global governance.
  
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==

Latest revision as of 18:49, 16 January 2020

Gulf War
[[image:
USAF F-16A, F-15C, F-15E combat aircraft flying over burning oil wells during Operation Desert Storm.
|290px]]
Overview
Part of
Date August 2, 1990-March 5, 1991
Location Iraq and Kuwait
Combatants
Iraq Kuwait
USA
United Kingdom
Saudi-Arabia
Commanders
Saddam Hussein Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr.
Strength
650.000 956.600
Casualties
20.000–35.000 deaths 1.200 deaths (Kuwait), 392 deaths (others)


The Persian Gulf War was started when Iraq, under Saddam Hussein's leadership, invaded Kuwait on August 2, 1990. The United Nations commanded Saddam to leave Kuwait but he rejected the idea. After much planning an international force involving the armies and air forces of, among others, the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Canada and South Korea forced Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait on February 28, 1991.

In the lead up to the war, April Glaspie met with Hussein on July 25, 1990, indicating in a conversation that he may have Kuwait claiming that whatever he does to solve his dispute is not within US interests.[1][2][3] Leading up to the first Gulf War, on September 11, 1990, President George H.W. Bush addressing the United Nations stated: "Out of these troubled times, our fifth objective – a New World Order – can emerge: a new era" thus becoming the first President of the United States of America to openly state and work toward global governance.

See also

References