Difference between revisions of "Hadrian's Wall"

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It stretched across northern England from [[Wallsend]] in the east to [[Bowness on Solway]] in the west, and formed the northern boundary of the Roman Empire, though a subsequent temporary northward advance took them as far as the [[Antonine Wall]].
 
It stretched across northern England from [[Wallsend]] in the east to [[Bowness on Solway]] in the west, and formed the northern boundary of the Roman Empire, though a subsequent temporary northward advance took them as far as the [[Antonine Wall]].
  
After the fall of the [[Roman Empire]], much of the stone from the wall was taken and reused building local [[churches]] and abbeys, not to mention housing and farmsteads. All that remains of the wall are small sections which constitute something of a tourist attraction.
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After the fall of the [[Roman Empire]], much of the stone from the wall was taken and reused building local [[churches]] and abbeys, as well as housing and farmsteads. All that remains of the wall are small sections which constitute something of a tourist attraction.
  
 
[[Category:Ancient Rome]]
 
[[Category:Ancient Rome]]
 
[[Category:Buildings]]
 
[[Category:Buildings]]
 
[[Category:Tourist Attractions]]
 
[[Category:Tourist Attractions]]

Revision as of 15:04, 28 June 2007

Hadrian's Wall was a wall built by the Romans across Britain in the 2nd century AD, to defend their northern frontier from Pictish incursions.

It stretched across northern England from Wallsend in the east to Bowness on Solway in the west, and formed the northern boundary of the Roman Empire, though a subsequent temporary northward advance took them as far as the Antonine Wall.

After the fall of the Roman Empire, much of the stone from the wall was taken and reused building local churches and abbeys, as well as housing and farmsteads. All that remains of the wall are small sections which constitute something of a tourist attraction.