Homework Three Answers - Student Eight

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1. Identify two of the biggest weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.

The two biggest weaknesses I see in the Articles of Confederation was the lack of a proper foundation of federal power and the bureaucratic nightmare to pass laws under its directions.

The biggest weakness, however, though without a doubt was the federal government’s inability to draw in sufficient revenue from taxes. This poor system limited the ultimate power of the government simply by denying it of cash, the life blood of any organization.

Excellent analysis.

2. Other than George Washington, who do you think was the most influential Founding Father?

While I like Benjamin Franklin I find it hard to decide who the most influential founding Father was as I simply don’t know. The notes of the event were mostly destroyed and we have very little idea how influential most of the attendees were.

Good answer.

6. Describe two important aspects of the Northwest Ordinance.

The two main important aspects of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 was its ability to create new states efficiently and it secured the land to the west of the states as the property of the United States when it was passed again after the Constitutional Convention. Another important aspect was that many of the important rights that were placed to protect the populace in these areas such as the protection of private property and the rite of habeas corpus were placed into effect in these lands.

Excellent. (Note: "right of habeas corpus," not "rite of habeas corpus.")

8. Write about any issue related to this week's lecture.

Question: was the American Revolution a "conservative revolution?"

Honestly I think not. The revolution at its true core was an economic issue, not some move to establish ideas that didn’t exist at the time. The British crown had taxed them beyond what they wished to bear and they wanted to break from the empire that was hurting them. The idea of the revolution being a political action airing to the conservative side is out of place. Such ideas that conservatives use now weren’t even being used back then and as one can see from the blunders of the Articles of Confederation the founders were not the finest politicians as it took a number of years before they fully founded their country.

If any thing we must remember that the ideals of conservatism were laid out in the Constitution, not during the Revolution nine years earlier. The revolution wasn’t originally planned to create the government we have today. The Constitution that conservatives rally behind was a by product of the revolution, not the focus for it.

I don't entirely agree, but your answer is well done. I would say that the same moral and logical values that unite conservatives today were the principles behind the American Revolution. For example, Patrick Henry College draws its name and inspiration from Patrick Henry, so there must be a fair amount of agreement between conservatives now and patriots then.

H5. Write about any issue related to this week's lecture.

Debate: Should the President be required to turn documents over to Congress?

Not at all! They are two entirely different powers and one does not answer to the other. The action of George Washington with regard to “Jay’s Treaty” was perfectly acceptable. This was one of those many “checks and balances” that exist in our government and endures to this day.

Terrific answer, which could become part of the model answers.

James G

Grade: 50/50. Great answers, but only 5 of them?--Andy Schlafly 13:40, 27 February 2011 (EST)