Last modified on August 19, 2021, at 19:20

Hugh D. Scott

Hugh Doggett Scott, Jr.
SenHughScott.jpg
Former U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania
From: January 3, 1959 – January 3, 1977
Predecessor Edward Martin
Successor John Heinz
Former Senate Republican Leader
From: September 6, 1969 – January 3, 1977
Deputy Robert P. Griffin
Predecessor Everett Dirksen
Successor Howard Baker
Former U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania's 6th Congressional District
From: January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1959
Predecessor Herbert J. McGlinchey
Successor Herman Toll
Former U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania's 7th Congressional District
From: January 3, 1941 – January 3, 1945
Predecessor George P. Darrow
Successor James Wolfenden
Information
Party Republican
Spouse(s) Marian Huntington Chase Scott
Religion Episcopalian[1]
Military Service
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Army
United States Navy
Service Years 1917–1918 (Army)
1940–1946 (Navy)
Rank Cadet (Army)
Commander (Navy)
Battles/wars World War I
World War II

Hugh Doggett Scott, Jr. (November 11, 1900 – July 21, 1994), was a Republican U.S. representative and senator from Pennsylvania, with his political career spanning from the early 1940s to the late 1970s. A leader among the establishment wing of his party, Scott was considered a Moderate Republican[2] and an internationalist.

Political career

U.S. House of Representatives

Scott was one of forty-nine House Republicans who voted in July 1953 against the re-enactment of the Select Committee to Investigate Tax-Exempt Foundations and Comparable Organizations.[3] It was approved 209–163 vote and became known during the congressional session as the Reece Committee, the namesake being its chair, Tennessee Republican B. Carroll Reece. The latter pushed for House approval of re-creating the committee following the incompetence of its previous chair, Georgia segregationist Eugene E. Cox, in the previous Congress.[4]

U.S. Senate

In the 1948 presidential election, Scott supported Moderate Republican Thomas Dewey.[5] In the 1952 election, he was an early supporter of the more moderate Dwight Eisenhower over Robert A. Taft.[6] Along with Jacob Javits of New York, he voiced skepticisms of conservative Barry Goldwater in the 1964 election and even speculated the possibility of starting an "independent" campaign similar to the opposition Theodore Roosevelt formed against William Howard Taft in 1912;[7] Goldwater responded:[6]

The Republican establishment is desperate to defeat me. They can’t stand having someone they can’t control.

In mid-July 1964, Scott predicted that Goldwater would close in on the Republican nomination and ultimately lose to fellow Pennsylvania Moderate Republican William Scranton,[8] who he served on the campaign of.[5] He was ultimately proven wrong when the Arizona senator was picked in a sharp rebuke to the Republican establishment. Although Goldwater would lose the general election to Democrat incumbent Lyndon B. Johnson by a landslide, he sparked a revival of the conservative movement which later propelled Ronald Reagan to the presidency in 1980.

In the same election cycle, Scott faced a strong challenge from Democrat State Secretary of Internal Affairs and later Judge Genevieve Blatt (1913-1996), who noted the incumbent senator's uncomfortableness with Goldwater as contrasted to her openness toward Johnson.[9] Scott only won the general election over Blatt by 1.5 percentage points.[10]

Despite his very moderate, sometimes left-leaning record, Scott maintained good relationships with his more conservative colleagues by continuously denying that he was a liberal.[2]

Scott voted for the Civil Rights Acts of 1957,[11] 1960,[12] 1964,[13] 1968,[14] the 24th Amendment,[15] as well as the Voting Rights Act of 1965.[16] He also supported conservative colleague Everett Dirksen's 1966 school prayer amendment,[17] which was introduced as a response to the Supreme Court decision in Engel v. Vitale.

Upon the death in 1969 of Senate Republican Leader Dirksen of Illinois, Scott won the leadership post over later minority and majority leader Howard Baker of eastern Tennessee. Scott vacated the Senate in 1977, having declined to seek reelection in 1976, when Jimmy Carter carried Pennsylvania against Gerald Ford.

Along with Goldwater and John Jacob Rhodes in 1974, Scott told President Richard Nixon that there were no chances of him being saved from impeachment and conviction over the Watergate scandal.[18] Nixon subsequently resigned, handing over the presidency to Gerald Ford.

According to a GovTrack ranking in 1976, Scott held a very moderate voting record.[19]

References

  1. Scott, G to I. The Political Graveyard. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Senator Hugh Scott, 93, Dies; Former Leader of Republicans. The New York Times. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  3. H RES 217. RESOLUTION CREATING A SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO CON- DUCT A FULL AND COMPLETE INVESTIGATION AND STUDY OF EDUCA- TIONAL AND PHILANTHROPIC FOUNDATIONS AND OTHER COMPARABLE ORGANIZATIONS WHICH ARE EXEMPT FROM FED. INCOME TAXATION.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  4. FascinatingPolitics (December 22, 2019). The Reece Committee on Foundations: Conspiratorial Nonsense or an Expose of a Threat to the Nation?. Mad Politics: The Bizarre, Fascinating, and Unknown of American Political History. Retrieved August 8, 2021.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Man in the News; Fighter for Scranton; Hugh Doggett Scott Jr.. The New York Times. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Dickerson, John (May 12, 2016). Never Goldwater. Slate. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  7. Goldwater Appeal: Not Only ‘Nuts and Kooks’; The Senator's strength is more broadly based than his Republican rivals suspected. Now they face what parties try to avoid—a fight to the finish.. The New York Times. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  8. SCRANTON'S CAMP PREDICTS VICTORY. The New York Times. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  9. Miss Blatt Opens Senate Race After Claiming Primary Victory; Pennsylvania Democrat Says Rival Will Lose Appeal—Tarns Her Fire on Scott. The New York Times. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  10. PA US Senate Race - Nov 03, 1964. Our Campaigns. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  11. HR. 6127. CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1957.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  12. HR. 8601. PASSAGE OF AMENDED BILL.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  13. HR. 7152. PASSAGE.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  14. TO PASS H.R. 2516, A BILL TO PROHIBIT DISCRIMINATION IN SALE OR RENTAL OF HOUSING, AND TO PROHIBIT RACIALLY MOTIVATED INTERFERENCE WITH A PERSON EXERCISING HIS CIVIL RIGHTS, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 19, 2021.
  15. S.J. RES. 29. APPROVAL OF RESOLUTION BANNING THE POLL TAX AS PREREQUISITE FOR VOTING IN FEDERAL ELECTIONS.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 19, 2021.
  16. TO PASS S. 1564, THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 19, 2021.
  17. TO PASS S. J. RES 144, A RESOLUTION PROPOSING A CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT PERMITTING SCHOOL PRAYERS.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  18. Nowicki, Dan (August 2, 2014). In 1974, Goldwater and Rhodes told Nixon he was doomed. The Arizona Republic. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  19. Sen. Hugh Scott Jr.. GovTrack.us. Retrieved June 20, 2021.

External links

  • Profile at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  • Profile at United States Senate
  • Profile at Find a Grave