Difference between revisions of "Human being"

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m (Confidence. We know some things as facts, so why prefix with disclaimers?)
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'''Human beings''' is a term for a [[homo sapiens|human]] that empasizes the role of a human not merely as a social animal, but a thinking person. Judaism and Christianity hold that human beings were created in the image of [[God]]<ref>"Male and female He created them." (Genesis 1)</ref>.
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'''Human beings''' is a term for a [[homo sapiens|human]] that empasizes the role of a human not merely as a social animal, but a thinking person. Human beings were created in the image of [[God]]<ref>"Male and female He created them." (Genesis 1)</ref>.
  
 
The academic study of human beings falls under any of the following fields of study, which collectively are known as the "Social Sciences":
 
The academic study of human beings falls under any of the following fields of study, which collectively are known as the "Social Sciences":
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[[Philosophy]] and [[religion]] have long considered the mystery of the origin of human behavior.
 
[[Philosophy]] and [[religion]] have long considered the mystery of the origin of human behavior.
  
[[Christianity]] in particular holds that, while created in God's image, humanity is essentially [[sin|sinful]], and that by embracing [[Jesus Christ]] as a savior can be rescued from this sin. St. Paul wrote, "Not all flesh is alike, but there is one flesh for human beings, another for animals, another for birds, and another for fish." (I Corinthians 15:35-44)
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While created in God's image, humanity is essentially [[sin|sinful]], and by embracing [[Jesus Christ]] as a savior can be rescued from this sin. St. Paul wrote, "Not all flesh is alike, but there is one flesh for human beings, another for animals, another for birds, and another for fish." (I Corinthians 15:35-44)
  
 
[[Moral naturalism]] rejects divine revelation as the source of human behavior, ethics, and morals, holding that they emerged from natural causes. The nature of these natural causes is widely debated, ranging from features inherent in the nervous system of humans to natural pressures that led to emergence of the best course for survival as a society, much as instincts emerge as the best course for survival among animals in the wild.
 
[[Moral naturalism]] rejects divine revelation as the source of human behavior, ethics, and morals, holding that they emerged from natural causes. The nature of these natural causes is widely debated, ranging from features inherent in the nervous system of humans to natural pressures that led to emergence of the best course for survival as a society, much as instincts emerge as the best course for survival among animals in the wild.

Revision as of 11:30, 13 July 2007

Human beings is a term for a human that empasizes the role of a human not merely as a social animal, but a thinking person. Human beings were created in the image of God[1].

The academic study of human beings falls under any of the following fields of study, which collectively are known as the "Social Sciences":

Origins of human behavior

Philosophy and religion have long considered the mystery of the origin of human behavior.

While created in God's image, humanity is essentially sinful, and by embracing Jesus Christ as a savior can be rescued from this sin. St. Paul wrote, "Not all flesh is alike, but there is one flesh for human beings, another for animals, another for birds, and another for fish." (I Corinthians 15:35-44)

Moral naturalism rejects divine revelation as the source of human behavior, ethics, and morals, holding that they emerged from natural causes. The nature of these natural causes is widely debated, ranging from features inherent in the nervous system of humans to natural pressures that led to emergence of the best course for survival as a society, much as instincts emerge as the best course for survival among animals in the wild.

References

  1. "Male and female He created them." (Genesis 1)