Difference between revisions of "Ivy League"

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The '''Ivy League''' is an [[athletic conference]] of eight private universities in the Northeast; during the first half of the 1900s they played each other frequently. By the 1930s they were referred informally to as the "Ivy League," but the organization was not formalized until 1954.  
 
The '''Ivy League''' is an [[athletic conference]] of eight private universities in the Northeast; during the first half of the 1900s they played each other frequently. By the 1930s they were referred informally to as the "Ivy League," but the organization was not formalized until 1954.  
  
By extension, the term also refers to the eight schools considered as a group, and to social characteristics perceived to be common to the group. The schools of the Ivy League are all old—all but Cornell having been founded before the American Revolution. They are all stellar in academics, and all of them have a traditional connection with social prestige. Six of them were founded as Protestant institutions (Penn and Cornell were founded as nondenominational).
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By extension, the term also refers to the eight schools considered as a group, and to social characteristics perceived to be common to the group. The schools of the Ivy League are all old—all but Cornell having been founded before the American Revolution. They are all stellar in academics, and all of them have a traditional connection with social prestige. Six of them were founded as Protestant institutions. (Five were firmly connected with specific denominations. Penn and Cornell were founded as nondenominational; Brown was founded as Baptist but with a charter declaring religious liberty—and also with compulsory chapel).
  
 
The nickname comes from the old brick buildings on their [[campus]]es, which have had time to grow dense coverings of [[ivy]].
 
The nickname comes from the old brick buildings on their [[campus]]es, which have had time to grow dense coverings of [[ivy]].
  
 
Its members include [[Harvard University]], [[Yale University]], [[Columbia University]], [[Dartmouth University]], [[Brown University]], [[University of Pennsylvania]], [[Princeton University]], and [[Cornell University]].
 
Its members include [[Harvard University]], [[Yale University]], [[Columbia University]], [[Dartmouth University]], [[Brown University]], [[University of Pennsylvania]], [[Princeton University]], and [[Cornell University]].

Revision as of 04:02, 3 May 2007

The Ivy League is an athletic conference of eight private universities in the Northeast; during the first half of the 1900s they played each other frequently. By the 1930s they were referred informally to as the "Ivy League," but the organization was not formalized until 1954.

By extension, the term also refers to the eight schools considered as a group, and to social characteristics perceived to be common to the group. The schools of the Ivy League are all old—all but Cornell having been founded before the American Revolution. They are all stellar in academics, and all of them have a traditional connection with social prestige. Six of them were founded as Protestant institutions. (Five were firmly connected with specific denominations. Penn and Cornell were founded as nondenominational; Brown was founded as Baptist but with a charter declaring religious liberty—and also with compulsory chapel).

The nickname comes from the old brick buildings on their campuses, which have had time to grow dense coverings of ivy.

Its members include Harvard University, Yale University, Columbia University, Dartmouth University, Brown University, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and Cornell University.