Difference between revisions of "Jainism"

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(This is the current conservative concensus of jainism. Earlier version was from outside perspective who has no idea about the real meaning of jainism)
m (Reverted edits by Theologian (talk) to last revision by 1990'sguy)
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'''Jainism''' means path shown by Jina. In Jina's path, different types of descriptions are found from different angles
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'''Jainism''' is a [[religion]] which stresses extreme non-violence towards all life. Jainism is a [[Dharmic religion]] and is not a branch of [[Hinduism]]. Jainism was founded by [[Mahavira]], who taught self-denial and non-violence toward all forms of life. Jainism's strict rules of non-violence, non-possessiveness, chastity, non-theft, and truth<ref>http://www.angelfire.com/co/jainism/5vows.html</ref> caused it to lose popularity, but today it has over 4 million adherents worldwide. Jainism rejects the authority of the Vedas, sacred scriptures of Hinduism.
of different standpoints in different contexts. At some places, description is found with the prominence of real standpoint; the
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same should be known "to be exactly true". And at other places description is found with the prominence of
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conventional standpoint; the same should be known that" it is not so, it is described to be so conventionally from
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the instrumental cause, etc. point of view." Knowing in this way only constitutes the acceptance of both the
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standpoints. But knowing the description of both the standpoints as equally true i.e., "this is also true and that is also
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true" - in this way knowing and accepting both standpoints fallaciously, is not advocated.
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From real point of view, the soul substance is a self-evident entity separate from other substances and inseparable from its own qualities; those who are not able to identify it, if discoursed repeatedly in this way, then they would not be able to understand. Therefore, to make them understand
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Jainism and Hinduism have coexisted for thousands of years, and so there are similarities in customs and religious holidays between the religions. Furthermore, the Buddha is revered as a holy figure, and most Jain homes will have a Buddha figurine or picture looking over the living area in the belief that it will bring prosperity.
is explained by means of conventional standpoint through its embodied forms of human-hellish-earthen beings in association with other substances like
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body, etc.; then "the human being is soul, the hellish being is soul" - they are able to identify the soul along with its embodied forms.
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Or (for the sake of explanation) by creating divisions in the indivisible substance, the details of soul are stated through knowledge, perception, etc. attributes and modifications. Then the knower is the soul, the seer is the soul - with these different traits, they are able to identify the soul.
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Further, from real point of view, passionlessness is the path of liberation. Those who do not understand this, if discoursed repeatedly in this way, then they would not be able to understand. Therefore, by means of conventional standpoint, the details of passionlessness are explained to them in the form of observance of vows, chastity, continence, etc. in relation to dissociation of the instrumentality of other substances; then they are able to identify passionlessness.
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Further, from the viewpoint of getting rid of the instrumental cause of other substances, the observance of vows, chastity, continence, etc. is stated to be the liberation path; so one should not believe their observance only to be the liberation path; for, if adopting and forsaking of other substances be possible for the soul then the soul would become the doer and the destroyer of other substances. But no substance is dependent on other substance. Therefore, the soul becomes passionless by renouncing the feelings of attachment, etc. So, in reality, passionlessness only is the liberation path. In some way, there is cause and effect relationship between passionlessness and observance of vows, etc., therefore, observance of vows, etc. is stated to be the liberation path; this statement is for the sake of statement only. In reality, the external conduct is not the liberation path.
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The swastika is also a holy symbol for Jains, but is in no way connected with the Nazi [[swastika]].
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==Jainism and the Mauryan Empire==
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Chandragupta Maurya, the founder of the Mauryan Empire was unusual because he was Jainist. He was the first emperor of India to be converted to Jainism and was frowned upon by the Hindu priests.  When he was older, Chandragupta renounced his throne and joined a wandering group of Jainist monks. Chandragupta's example had no effect on the people; his successor, Emperor Bindusara, was Hindu.
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<center>
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[[File:Jain Temple in the old part of Fort Cochin Kerala.jpg]]
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Jain Temple in the old part of Fort Kochi, Kerala, [[India]].
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</center>
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 10:10, 17 June 2019

Jainism is a religion which stresses extreme non-violence towards all life. Jainism is a Dharmic religion and is not a branch of Hinduism. Jainism was founded by Mahavira, who taught self-denial and non-violence toward all forms of life. Jainism's strict rules of non-violence, non-possessiveness, chastity, non-theft, and truth[1] caused it to lose popularity, but today it has over 4 million adherents worldwide. Jainism rejects the authority of the Vedas, sacred scriptures of Hinduism.

Jainism and Hinduism have coexisted for thousands of years, and so there are similarities in customs and religious holidays between the religions. Furthermore, the Buddha is revered as a holy figure, and most Jain homes will have a Buddha figurine or picture looking over the living area in the belief that it will bring prosperity.

The swastika is also a holy symbol for Jains, but is in no way connected with the Nazi swastika.

Jainism and the Mauryan Empire

Chandragupta Maurya, the founder of the Mauryan Empire was unusual because he was Jainist. He was the first emperor of India to be converted to Jainism and was frowned upon by the Hindu priests. When he was older, Chandragupta renounced his throne and joined a wandering group of Jainist monks. Chandragupta's example had no effect on the people; his successor, Emperor Bindusara, was Hindu.


Jain Temple in the old part of Fort Cochin Kerala.jpg

Jain Temple in the old part of Fort Kochi, Kerala, India.

See also

References

  1. http://www.angelfire.com/co/jainism/5vows.html