Difference between revisions of "James Garfield"

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James Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States, and the only one to serve as a clergyman while in the White House.<ref>http://www.kencollins.com/about/about.htm</ref>  He was assassinated by a deranged gunman who many have sought to make the Vice President, [[Chester Arthur]], the next President.
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James Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States, and the only one to serve as a clergyman while in the White House.<ref>http://www.kencollins.com/about/about.htm</ref>  He was assassinated by a deranged gunman named [[Charles Julius Guiteau]], probably for purposes of political jealousy.
  
 
Garfield suffered for weeks from the lodging of the bullet inside him, first in the White House and then at a New Jersey seaside location.  Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, attempted to find the internal bullet with his own invention, an induction-balance electrical device.  All attempts at removing the bullet were unsuccessful, and Garfield died on September 19, 1881 from an infection and internal hemorrhage.<ref>http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/jg20.html</ref>
 
Garfield suffered for weeks from the lodging of the bullet inside him, first in the White House and then at a New Jersey seaside location.  Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, attempted to find the internal bullet with his own invention, an induction-balance electrical device.  All attempts at removing the bullet were unsuccessful, and Garfield died on September 19, 1881 from an infection and internal hemorrhage.<ref>http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/jg20.html</ref>

Revision as of 06:45, 31 March 2007

James Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States, and the only one to serve as a clergyman while in the White House.[1] He was assassinated by a deranged gunman named Charles Julius Guiteau, probably for purposes of political jealousy.

Garfield suffered for weeks from the lodging of the bullet inside him, first in the White House and then at a New Jersey seaside location. Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, attempted to find the internal bullet with his own invention, an induction-balance electrical device. All attempts at removing the bullet were unsuccessful, and Garfield died on September 19, 1881 from an infection and internal hemorrhage.[2]


Sources:
  1. http://www.kencollins.com/about/about.htm
  2. http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/jg20.html