Difference between revisions of "Jerry Falwell"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m
(Undo revision 935214 by Cormac (talk) rvv)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[Image:Jfalwell.jpg|thumb|250px|Right|The Reverend Jerry Falwell <Br>1933-2007]]
 
[[Image:Jfalwell.jpg|thumb|250px|Right|The Reverend Jerry Falwell <Br>1933-2007]]
'''Jerry Falwell''' (August 11, 1933 – May 15, 2007) was a politically active [[United States|American]] evangelical, and one of the biggest influences on the conservative movement in the late 20th century and a leader in gaining Christian Evangelical support for Israel. <ref>[http://www.cmep.org/Alerts/2004March31.htm Washington Post on Evangelical-Israeli connection,] Bill Broadway, ''Washington Post'', March 27, 2004.</ref>  Falwell was born on August 11, 1933 along with his twin brother, Gene.  Jerry and Gene were the youngest children in a family of 5.  Young Jerry Falwell was recognized for his incredible intellect at a young age, skipping the second grade at Mountain View Elementary School.  He held firm on this intelligence, even finding a way to obtain his driver's license at the age of 13 - 3 years before he was legally eligible. Jerry Lamon Falwell, Sr. (August 11, 1933 – May 15, 2007) was an American fundamentalist Christian pastor and televangelist. He was the founding pastor of the Thomas Road Baptist Church in Lynchburg, Virginia in the Christian (big "C") nation of the United States of America. He founded Liberty University in 1971 and co-founded the Moral Majority in 1979.
+
'''Jerry Falwell''' (August 11, 1933 – May 15, 2007) was a politically active [[United States|American]] evangelical, and one of the biggest influences on the conservative movement in the late 20th century and a leader in gaining Christian Evangelical support for Israel. <ref>[http://www.cmep.org/Alerts/2004March31.htm Washington Post on Evangelical-Israeli connection,] Bill Broadway, ''Washington Post'', March 27, 2004.</ref>  Falwell was born on August 11, 1933 along with his twin brother, Gene.  Jerry and Gene were the youngest children in a family of 5.  Young Jerry Falwell was recognized for his incredible intellect at a young age, skipping the second grade at Mountain View Elementary School.  He held firm on this intelligence, even finding a way to obtain his driver's license at the age of 13 - 3 years before he was legally eligible.
 
+
Falwell led services at Thomas Road Baptist Church, a megachurch in Lynchburg, Virginia from 1956-2007. His Christ-centered leadership lead to the expansion of the church, with it eventually reaching gigachurch status, helped in no small part by the addition of a Putt-Putt for Jesus mini-golf course in 1961, a Christian-themed Holy Roller roller disco in 1977[1], and a Christian bookstore[2] in 1984. He changed affiliations from the staunchly conservative Baptist Bible Fellowship International to the incredibly conservative Southern Baptist Convention after the BBFI failed to adequately condemn homosexuality[3], homosexuals, and the dirty things that the latter do to each other in public washrooms, nightclubs and Vermont, and ended his self-identification with fundamentalism in favor of evangelicalism, which has more things that are tax-exempt and the groupies have bigger hair.
+
 
+
Falwell's shift from fundamentalism to evangelicalism is said to have occurred in a roadside conversion, after he had his driver pull his limousine over to the side of the road so that he could berate a homeless man for being lazy. "When I was done verbally castrating the man," Falwell recounts in his book You've got a mote in your eye, America[4], "Fundamentally, I returned to the car, and over the roar of the A/C heard Paul of Tarsis tell me to take my fundamental fundamentalism on the road...and what better way to fundamentally spread the Good News that people who aren't exactly like me are all going to Hell than evangelicalism?"[5]
+
  
 
==Early years==
 
==Early years==

Revision as of 15:53, 9 November 2011

The Reverend Jerry Falwell
1933-2007

Jerry Falwell (August 11, 1933 – May 15, 2007) was a politically active American evangelical, and one of the biggest influences on the conservative movement in the late 20th century and a leader in gaining Christian Evangelical support for Israel. [1] Falwell was born on August 11, 1933 along with his twin brother, Gene. Jerry and Gene were the youngest children in a family of 5. Young Jerry Falwell was recognized for his incredible intellect at a young age, skipping the second grade at Mountain View Elementary School. He held firm on this intelligence, even finding a way to obtain his driver's license at the age of 13 - 3 years before he was legally eligible.

Early years

During his teen years, Falwell excelled in athletic endeavors. During high school Falwell played football, basketball and baseball. He valued athletics for their numerous benefits: teamwork, coordination, fitness and overall health.

Dr. Falwell became a committed Christian on January 20, 1952 while enrolled at Lynchburg College. He bought his first Bible the day after his baptism, and carried it with him wherever he went. After graduating Lynchburg College, Falwell enrolled in Baptist Bible College in Missouri, later joining the vaulted rank of clergy. [6] In 1956, he founded Thomas Road Baptist Church in an abandoned bottling plant, [7] and today the church has 22,000 members.

Ministry

In 1971, Falwell founded Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. The University provides an opportunity for students to gain the benefits of a rich and diverse academic environment while simultaneously offering the opportunity to become closer to God.

Moral Majority

In June of 1979, Dr. Falwell organized the Moral Majority, a coalition of groups whose mailing lists reached over 100,000 clergy representing over 7 million conservative, religious Americans. The Moral Majority, part of the Religious Right, organized a series of voting drives and political demonstrations to advance their conservative point of view and enhance the moral and religious attitudes of the nation. It is best known for supporting Ronald Reagan's election in 1980, and registering millions of voters to act on his behalf. The Moral Majority played little role during the Reagan years; Falwell stepped down as its leader in 1987 and it was disbanded in 1989.

Controversy

Falwell was best known for his beliefs in the benefit of public debate. At Liberty University, he hosted an annual undergraduate debate tournament that attracts schools all across the country. At the tournaments, he participate in a "question and answer" sessions. Falwell's rhetorical prowess shone at such events. Falwell also regularly appeared on news broadcasts, preaching the word of God and his conservative point of view. He refused to back down from positions that he realized were unpopular. Falwell was former prime minister of New Zealand David Lange's opponent in the Oxford Union debate with the moot "nuclear weapons are morally indefensible".

Obesity

Medical research indicates that excess weight impairs brain function.[2]

Despite being a Christian and knowing that the Bible declares gluttony to be a sin, Falwell had issues with being overweight. According to medical science, there are a significant number of physical and mental health related problems associated with being overweight.

Personal Life

Reverend Falwell was married to Mrs. Macel Falwell. The two tied the proverbial knot on April 12, 1958. The couple had three children: Jerry Jr., Jonathan and Jeannie. Jerry is currently an attorney and Vice-Chancellor at Liberty University. Jonathan is an attorney and pastor in Lynchburg, Virginia. Jeannie is a surgeon in Virginia.

Reverend Falwell passed away on May 15, 2007.

Reference

  1. Washington Post on Evangelical-Israeli connection, Bill Broadway, Washington Post, March 27, 2004.