Justin Trudeau

From Conservapedia
This is an old revision of this page, as edited by YortKeldher (Talk | contribs) at 07:46, 3 June 2017. It may differ significantly from current revision.

Jump to: navigation, search

Justin Trudeau is the leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. He is the son of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. He represents the Montreal-area riding of Papaineau in the House of Commons and became the Prime Minister in the 2015 Canadian federal election. However, the election result became shrouded in controversy when it was discovered that campaigners from Barack Obama's campaign team got involved in the election to campaign on Trudeau's behalf, guiding Trudeau to victory and resulting in accusations of foreign interference in the Canadian election process.[1]

One of Trudeau's first acts is to spend $1.6 billion to import 25,000 Syrian migrants. Most Canadians live within 200 miles of the Canadian border, which is almost entirely unsecured.

Trudeau has pulled Canadian forces from the alliance against ISIS, and withdrawn from defense agreements with the United States, such as the F-35 agreement. He also plans to legalize marijuana and prostitution.

So far American political leaders, including Republicans, have been silent on the threat Trudeau poses to the United States.

Remarks about Fidel Castro

After communist dictator Fidel Castro's death was reported, Trudeau stated he was mourning his death, and among other positive statements, called Castro a "remarkable leader."[2] Outrage erupted, and many mocked him with "#TrudeauEulogies" on Twitter, after writing posts mourning the death of dictators.

Promises

A non-partisan website called TrudeauMetre tracks Trudeau's campaign promises, and their fulfillment or lack thereof. The metre records, as of early 2017, 38 achieved promises, 29 broken, 66 in progress, and 90 not yet begun.

References

  1. Obama Campaign Team Hands Canada Over to the Lib-Left at Canada Free Press
  2. Wootson, Cleve R., Jr. (November 26, 2016). Trudeau called Castro a ‘remarkable leader.’ Twitter imagined what he would say about Stalin. The Washington Post. Retrieved November 28, 2016.