Difference between revisions of "Lame duck"

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Soon after the 2006 Congressional election that gave Democrats control of Congress, [[George Bush]] became a lame duck having little political leverage, facing the opposite party in Congress which awaited the next president.
 
Soon after the 2006 Congressional election that gave Democrats control of Congress, [[George Bush]] became a lame duck having little political leverage, facing the opposite party in Congress which awaited the next president.
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==External Links==
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* [http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704293604575343262629361470.html?mod=WSJ_Opinion_LEADTop The Obama-Pelosi Lame Duck Strategy]
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[[Category:Political Terms]]
 
[[Category:Political Terms]]
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[[Category:Dictionary]]

Revision as of 19:53, 10 July 2010

A lame duck session is the short period after an election is held but before the newly elected representatives take office, which is typically November and December in an election year.

A lame duck is a politician who is in office during that period only, or who has effectively lost their power because the public is looking forward to his replacement.

With respect to presidents, the term lame duck often refers to their second term, when they are politically weaker due the constitutional prohibition against their serving a third full term. Lame duck presidents are typically unable to move legislation to passage, as Congress may stall until the next presidential election to pass its legislation.

Soon after the 2006 Congressional election that gave Democrats control of Congress, George Bush became a lame duck having little political leverage, facing the opposite party in Congress which awaited the next president.

External Links