Difference between revisions of "Larry Summers"

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Lawrence Henry ("Larry") Summers (b. 1954) is an economist who served as the [[United States Secretary of the Treasury|Secretary of the Treasury]] in the final year and a half of the Clinton administration.  From there he was selected to be the 27th President of Harvard University, considered to be the top position in academia. Lawrence Summers currently is the Director of the [[White House]]'s [[National Economic Council]] (NEC) for President [[Barack Obama]].
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'''Lawrence Henry ("Larry") Summers''' (b. 1954) is an economist who served as the [[United States Secretary of the Treasury|Secretary of the Treasury]] in the final year and a half of the Clinton administration.  From there he was selected to be the 27th President of Harvard University, considered to be the top position in academia. Lawrence Summers currently is the Director of the [[White House]]'s [[National Economic Council]] (NEC) for President [[Barack Obama]].
  
 
He served as President of Harvard from 2001 to 2006, when he was forced to resign after suggesting that the wide disparities between male and female academics in science, math and engineering may be due to innate differences in their aptitude or preference for those fields.   
 
He served as President of Harvard from 2001 to 2006, when he was forced to resign after suggesting that the wide disparities between male and female academics in science, math and engineering may be due to innate differences in their aptitude or preference for those fields.   

Revision as of 02:33, July 21, 2010

LarrySummers.jpg

Lawrence Henry ("Larry") Summers (b. 1954) is an economist who served as the Secretary of the Treasury in the final year and a half of the Clinton administration. From there he was selected to be the 27th President of Harvard University, considered to be the top position in academia. Lawrence Summers currently is the Director of the White House's National Economic Council (NEC) for President Barack Obama.

He served as President of Harvard from 2001 to 2006, when he was forced to resign after suggesting that the wide disparities between male and female academics in science, math and engineering may be due to innate differences in their aptitude or preference for those fields.

When he made this suggestion, in a private meeting, the ensuing uproar by liberals led to his ouster.

  • "I felt I was going to be sick," said MIT Biology Professor Nancy Hopkins, a biology professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who was attended the meeting, which was organized by the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass. "My heart was pounding and my breath was shallow," she said. "I was extremely upset."[1]

However, liberals since deny that as the cause of his termination, even though over a year later for the same reason they forced a rescission of an invitation for him speak to an academic audience.[Citation Needed]

Larry Summers and Leftist Economics

George Gerald Reisman, Professor Emeritus of Economics at Pepperdine University and author of Capitalism: A Treatise on Economics, wrote that Summers' socialistic ideas on redistributing wealth demonstrate that Summers is a "lightweight leftist" who "fails to understand the nature of the most essential feature of capitalism, namely, private ownership of the means of production and the indispensable role it plays in the standard of living of the average person."[2] Reisman also wrote that Summers is a shallow and ignorant man whose knowledge of economics is minimal and whose evil views qualify him to be the economic adviser to Hugo Chavez of Venezuela or Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, but do not qualify him to be an economic adviser to the President of the United States.[3]

References

  1. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19181-2005Jan18.html
  2. http://blog.mises.org/archives/009031.asp
  3. http://blog.mises.org/archives/009031.asp


See also