Difference between revisions of "Macroevolution"

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'''Macroevolution''' is the theory that [[natural selection]], [[mutation]]s, and genetic drift can, given enough time, lead to the creation of new groups of organisms consisting of a single common ancestor and all the descendants of that ancestor (see [[Clade]]s).
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'''Macroevolution''' is a distinction made by Creationists that separates the change of certain characteristics of a species, from the changes that [[natural selection]], [[mutation]]s, and genetic drift can, given enough time, lead to the creation of new groups of organisms consisting of a single common ancestor and all the descendants of that ancestor (see [[Clade]]s). Modern biologists do not make a distinction between microevolution and macroevolution, but instead group it under the general theory of Evolution. The rationale for this is that the change of characteristics inside a species is the primary factor in the defination of a species, thus invalidating an absolute description of species, but instead rendering all members in a species to follow a bell curve of differentiation, thus allowing the rise of a new species.
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The scientific data regarding mutations causing the changes necessary for macroevolution is damaging to the macroevolutionary position. <ref>Bergman, Jerry, [http://www.trueorigin.org/mutations01.asp Darwinism and the Deterioration of the Genome], ''Creation Research Society Quarterly'' 42(2), 2005.</ref>
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==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 14:21, 6 August 2013

Macroevolution is a distinction made by Creationists that separates the change of certain characteristics of a species, from the changes that natural selection, mutations, and genetic drift can, given enough time, lead to the creation of new groups of organisms consisting of a single common ancestor and all the descendants of that ancestor (see Clades). Modern biologists do not make a distinction between microevolution and macroevolution, but instead group it under the general theory of Evolution. The rationale for this is that the change of characteristics inside a species is the primary factor in the defination of a species, thus invalidating an absolute description of species, but instead rendering all members in a species to follow a bell curve of differentiation, thus allowing the rise of a new species.

See also

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