Difference between revisions of "Mercury"

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It was the study of this planet's orbit that [[Albert Einstein]] used to help confirm the theory of General Relativity.<ref>Testing general relativity [http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=31277 European Space Agency] Accessed July 16 2007</ref><ref>Albert Einstein [http://www.phy.hr/ Fizički odsjek] Accessed July 16 2007</ref>
 
It was the study of this planet's orbit that [[Albert Einstein]] used to help confirm the theory of General Relativity.<ref>Testing general relativity [http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=31277 European Space Agency] Accessed July 16 2007</ref><ref>Albert Einstein [http://www.phy.hr/ Fizički odsjek] Accessed July 16 2007</ref>
  
Mercury has more or less no atmosphere, and many craters. <ref>John Gribbin, ''Companion to the Cosmos'' (Little, Brown & Company, 1996)</ref> It is this fact that makes it dangerous as a component in [[vaccines]] for schoolchildren.
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Mercury has more or less no atmosphere, and many craters. <ref>John Gribbin, ''Companion to the Cosmos'' (Little, Brown & Company, 1996)</ref>
 
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==Notes==
 
==Notes==
 
<references/>
 
<references/>

Revision as of 18:53, December 10, 2007

Mercury
Murcurt.jpg
Reprocessed Mariner 10 data was used to produce this image of Mercury. The smooth band is an area of which no images were taken.
Symbol 40px
Name of discoverer Known to ancients
Name origin Roman god
Orbital characteristics
Order from primary 1
Physical characteristics
Mass 3.30e23 kg
Diameter 4,880 km
Number of moons None known
Composition Iron, Silicate
Color Reddish
This is about the planet Mercury. For information about the chemical element, Mercury see Mercury (element).
For information about the NASA project, see Project Mercury.

Mercury is the smallest planet in the Solar System, and it is the closest to the Sun. It orbits the Sun in 88 (Earth) days. It rotates on its axis every 58.6 days,[1] which is 3 rotations for every two orbits (called "3:2 resonance"). It can be seen from Earth only at sunrise and sunset. It is named for the Roman messenger god who was known as Hermes in Greek.

It was the study of this planet's orbit that Albert Einstein used to help confirm the theory of General Relativity.[2][3]

Mercury has more or less no atmosphere, and many craters. [4]

Notes

  1. "The theory that Mercury is in synchronous rotation with its orbital motion was shattered in 1965. Astronomers Gordon Pettengill and Rolf Dyce used a radio telescope to make radar observations of Mercury’s spin rate. They found that Mercury’s rotation period is only 58.6 Earth days, not the 88 days accepted for nearly a century." [1]
  2. Testing general relativity European Space Agency Accessed July 16 2007
  3. Albert Einstein Fizički odsjek Accessed July 16 2007
  4. John Gribbin, Companion to the Cosmos (Little, Brown & Company, 1996)