Difference between revisions of "Military"

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'''''The military''''' is a noun that refers either to the armed forces of a country, or the personnel.
 
'''''The military''''' is a noun that refers either to the armed forces of a country, or the personnel.
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== Religion in the military ==
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''See also:'' [[Religion in the military]]
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Encycylopedia.com states concerning [[religion in the military]]:
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{{Cquote|Religion in the [[Military]]. For more than 220 years, religion and religious leaders have provided a source of strength and faith for a total of 55 million Americans who have served in the military forces of the [[United States]]. The rigorous demands of military duties—separation from friends and family, training in remote locations, battle, and the possibility of violent death—have mandated support for those who serve and who may potentially lay down their lives for their country.<ref>[https://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/religion-military Religion in the military], Encylcylopedia.com</ref>}}
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 18:38, 8 August 2019

Military (latin: militaris - a soldier) is an adjective meaning relating to, or characteristic of members of the armed forces.

The military is a noun that refers either to the armed forces of a country, or the personnel.

Religion in the military

See also: Religion in the military

Encycylopedia.com states concerning religion in the military:

Religion in the Military. For more than 220 years, religion and religious leaders have provided a source of strength and faith for a total of 55 million Americans who have served in the military forces of the United States. The rigorous demands of military duties—separation from friends and family, training in remote locations, battle, and the possibility of violent death—have mandated support for those who serve and who may potentially lay down their lives for their country.[1]

See also

References

  1. Religion in the military, Encylcylopedia.com