Difference between revisions of "Month"

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[Intro: Pharrell]
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A '''month''' is a portion of a year corresponding roughly to the passage of the [[Earth]] round the moon (a 'lunar month', of which there are, in fact, thirteen). There are twelve terrestrial months in the [[Gregorian Calendar]], a practice started with the [[Roman]]s in the [[Julian Calendar]]. The months are named after pagan gods, goddesses, festivals, events, Roman emperorsm, and numbers. The ninth to twelfth months are named after the [[Latin]] words for seven to ten because in [[Roman]] times the year started with March.
Everybody get up
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Everybody get up
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Hey, hey, hey
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Hey, hey, hey
+
Hey, hey, hey
+
  
[Verse 1: Robin Thicke]
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==Months of the Year==
If you can't hear what I'm trying to say
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If you can't read from the same page
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Maybe I'm going deaf,
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Maybe I'm going blind
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Maybe I'm out of my mind
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[Pharrell:] Everybody get up
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[Pre-chorus: Robin Thicke]
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The months in order:
OK now he was close, tried to domesticate you
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But you're an animal, baby, it's in your nature
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Just let me liberate you
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Hey, hey, hey
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You don't need no papers
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Hey, hey, hey
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That man is not your maker
+
  
[Chorus: Robin Thicke]
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{| class="wikitable"
And that's why I'm gon' take a good girl
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|-
I know you want it
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! Name
I know you want it
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! Days
I know you want it
+
|-
You're a good girl
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|January
Can't let it get past me
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|31
You're far from plastic
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|-
Talk about getting blasted
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|-
I hate these blurred lines
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|February
I know you want it
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|28
I know you want it
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|-
I know you want it
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|-
But you're a good girl
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|March
The way you grab me
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|31
Must wanna get nasty
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|-
Go ahead, get at me
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|-
[Pharrell:] Everybody get up
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|April
 +
|30
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|May
 +
|31
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|June
 +
|30
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|July
 +
|31
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|August
 +
|31
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|September
 +
|30
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|October
 +
|31
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|November
 +
|30
 +
|-
 +
|-
 +
|December
 +
|31
 +
|-
 +
|}
  
[Verse 2: Robin Thicke]
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On [[leap year]]s, February will have 29 days instead of 28.
What do they make dreams for
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When you got them jeans on
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What do we need steam for
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You the hottest bitch in this place
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I feel so lucky
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Hey, hey, hey
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You wanna hug me
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Hey, hey, hey
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What rhymes with hug me?
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Hey, hey, hey
+
  
[Pre-chorus: Robin Thicke]
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A rhyme taught to children to remember the days of the month:
OK now he was close, tried to domesticate you
+
But you're an animal, baby it's in your nature
+
Just let me liberate you
+
Hey, hey, hey
+
You don't need no papers
+
Hey, hey, hey
+
That man is not your maker
+
Hey, hey, hey
+
  
[Chorus: Robin Thicke]
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:''Thirty days hath September''
And that's why I'm gon' take a good girl
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:''April, June, and November''  
I know you want it
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:''All the rest have thirty-one''  
I know you want it
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:''Except for February alone''
I know you want it
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:''Which has twenty-eight days clear''  
You're a good girl
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:''And twenty-nine in each leap year ''
Can't let it get past me
+
You're far from plastic
+
Talk about getting blasted
+
[Pharrell:] Everybody get up
+
I hate these blurred lines
+
I know you want it
+
I hate them lines
+
I know you want it
+
I hate them lines
+
I know you want it
+
But you're a good girl
+
The way you grab me
+
Must wanna get nasty
+
Go ahead, get at me
+
  
[Verse 3: T.I.]
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===January===
One thing I ask of you
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Originally named after [[Janus]], the two-headed [[Mythology|Roman god]] of the New Year. One of his heads looks back to the previous year, and the other looks forward in anticipation of the coming year.  [[New Year's Day]] and [[Martin Luther King Day]] are holidays that both occur during January.
Let me be the one you back that ass to
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Go, from Malibu, to Paris, boo
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Yeah, I had a bitch, but she ain't bad as you
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So hit me up when you pass through
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I'll give you something big enough to tear your ass in two
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Swag on, even when you dress casual
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I mean it's almost unbearable
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In a hundred years not dare, would I
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Pull a Pharside let you pass me by
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Nothing like your last guy, he too square for you
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He don't smack that ass and pull your hair like that
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So I just watch and wait for you to salute
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But you didn't pick
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Not many women can refuse this pimpin'
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I'm a nice guy, but don't get it if you get with me
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[Bridge: Robin Thicke]
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===February===
Shake the vibe, get down, get up
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The word derives from the [[Latin]] "Februārius" (ménsis), meaning "expiatory" (month), derivative of "februa," meaning "expiatory offerings."  It was named after the Roman purification or forgiveness festival.  It is the shortest of the months.  [[President's Day]] and [[Valentine's Day]] fall within February.
Do it like it hurt, like it hurt
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What you don't like work?
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[Pre-chorus: Robin Thicke]
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===March===
Baby can you breathe? I got this from Jamaica
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Originally amed after the Roman god of war, [[Mars (Mythology)|Mars]]. During Roman era, it was the first month of the year, thus explaining the names of September, October, November and December (respectively seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth in Latin, referring to their former relatives positions in the Roman calendar).  [[St. Patrick's Day]] occurs in March as does the famous reference to the [[Ides of March]], the death of [[Julius Caesar]].  [[Easter]] takes place in either March or April.
It always works for me, Dakota to Decatur, uh huh
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No more pretending
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Hey, hey, hey
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Cause now you winning
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Hey, hey, hey
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Here's our beginning
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[Chorus: Robin Thicke]
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===April===
I always wanted a good girl
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From the Latin word aperire meaning "to open" as in flower buds.  The first day of April is [[April Fools Day]].  Easter takes place in either March or April
(Pharrell: Everybody get up)
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I know you want it
+
I know you want it
+
I know you want it
+
You're a good girl
+
Can't let it get past me
+
You're far from plastic
+
Talk about getting blasted
+
I hate these blurred lines
+
(Pharrell: Everybody get up)
+
I know you want it
+
I know you want it
+
I know you want it
+
But you're a good girl
+
The way you grab me
+
Must wanna get nasty
+
Go ahead, get at me
+
  
[Outro: Pharrell]
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===May===
Everybody get up
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Named after the [[Norse]] goddess of the Earth, [[Maia]]. [[Mother's Day]] is in May.
Everybody get up
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Hey, hey, hey
+
===June===
 +
Was named for [[Juno]], the wife of [[Jupiter]] in Roman mythology.  [[Father's Day]] is in June.
 +
 
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===July===
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Was named after [[Julius Caesar]], the famous Roman general and statesman who was the creator of the [[Julian Calendar]].  The [[Fourth of July]] is celebrated as the day of the [[United States]] independence from [[Great Britain]].
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===August===
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Was named after [[Augustus]] Caesar, the first Emperor of Rome.
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===September===
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Literally means "seventh month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar.  [[Labor Day]] is in September.
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 +
===October===
 +
Literally means "eighth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar.  [[Halloween]] takes place on the last day of October.
 +
 
 +
===November===
 +
Literally means "ninth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar.  [[Thanksgiving]] takes place in November as does [[Veterans Day]].
 +
 
 +
===December===
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Literally means "tenth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar.  [[Christmas]] takes place in December.
 +
 
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==See also==
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* [[Season]]s
 +
 
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[[Category:Chronology]]

Latest revision as of 16:14, July 13, 2016

A month is a portion of a year corresponding roughly to the passage of the Earth round the moon (a 'lunar month', of which there are, in fact, thirteen). There are twelve terrestrial months in the Gregorian Calendar, a practice started with the Romans in the Julian Calendar. The months are named after pagan gods, goddesses, festivals, events, Roman emperorsm, and numbers. The ninth to twelfth months are named after the Latin words for seven to ten because in Roman times the year started with March.

Months of the Year

The months in order:

Name Days
January 31
February 28
March 31
April 30
May 31
June 30
July 31
August 31
September 30
October 31
November 30
December 31

On leap years, February will have 29 days instead of 28.

A rhyme taught to children to remember the days of the month:

Thirty days hath September
April, June, and November
All the rest have thirty-one
Except for February alone
Which has twenty-eight days clear
And twenty-nine in each leap year

January

Originally named after Janus, the two-headed Roman god of the New Year. One of his heads looks back to the previous year, and the other looks forward in anticipation of the coming year. New Year's Day and Martin Luther King Day are holidays that both occur during January.

February

The word derives from the Latin "Februārius" (ménsis), meaning "expiatory" (month), derivative of "februa," meaning "expiatory offerings." It was named after the Roman purification or forgiveness festival. It is the shortest of the months. President's Day and Valentine's Day fall within February.

March

Originally amed after the Roman god of war, Mars. During Roman era, it was the first month of the year, thus explaining the names of September, October, November and December (respectively seventh, eighth, ninth and tenth in Latin, referring to their former relatives positions in the Roman calendar). St. Patrick's Day occurs in March as does the famous reference to the Ides of March, the death of Julius Caesar. Easter takes place in either March or April.

April

From the Latin word aperire meaning "to open" as in flower buds. The first day of April is April Fools Day. Easter takes place in either March or April

May

Named after the Norse goddess of the Earth, Maia. Mother's Day is in May.

June

Was named for Juno, the wife of Jupiter in Roman mythology. Father's Day is in June.

July

Was named after Julius Caesar, the famous Roman general and statesman who was the creator of the Julian Calendar. The Fourth of July is celebrated as the day of the United States independence from Great Britain.

August

Was named after Augustus Caesar, the first Emperor of Rome.

September

Literally means "seventh month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. Labor Day is in September.

October

Literally means "eighth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. Halloween takes place on the last day of October.

November

Literally means "ninth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. Thanksgiving takes place in November as does Veterans Day.

December

Literally means "tenth month" in Latin in reference to its location in the old Roman Calendar. Christmas takes place in December.

See also