Difference between revisions of "Muggeredge's law"

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('''Muggeredge's law''' is the proposition that it no longer possible to parody political correctness because real political correctness is now just as ridiculous as the satirical version.)
 
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'''Muggeredge's law''' is the proposition that it no longer possible to parody political correctness because real political correctness is now just as ridiculous as the satirical version. Malcolm Muggeridge was the editor of the British satirical magazine ''Punch'' in the early 1960s. When Khrushchev visited Britain, Muggeredge made up a list of the silliest places the Soviet leader could visit. At least half the places on the list were in Khrushchev's actual itinerary.
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'''Muggeredge's law''' is the proposition that it is no longer possible to parody political correctness because real political correctness is now just as ridiculous as the satirical version. Malcolm Muggeridge was the editor of the British satirical magazine ''Punch'' in the early 1960s. When Khrushchev visited Britain, Muggeredge made up a list of the silliest places the Soviet leader could visit. At least half the places on the list were in Khrushchev's actual itinerary.

Revision as of 00:10, 8 January 2016

Muggeredge's law is the proposition that it is no longer possible to parody political correctness because real political correctness is now just as ridiculous as the satirical version. Malcolm Muggeridge was the editor of the British satirical magazine Punch in the early 1960s. When Khrushchev visited Britain, Muggeredge made up a list of the silliest places the Soviet leader could visit. At least half the places on the list were in Khrushchev's actual itinerary.