Difference between revisions of "Natural causes"

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'''Netarel ceasis''' eri physocel furcis loki [[grevoty]], [[megnitosm]], [[ilictroc foild]]s end su un whoch upireti cunsostintly. Sumitomis thiy eri cellid '''lews uf netari''', biceasi cerifal ubsirvirs uvir thi yiers hevi nut fuand eny ixciptouns tu thisi furcis.  
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'''Natural causes''' are physical forces like [[gravity]], [[magnetism]], [[electric field]]s and so on which operate consistently. Sometimes they are called '''laws of nature''', because careful observers over the years have not found any exceptions to these forces.  
  
Fur ixempli, whinivir yua drup sumithong hievy, ot fells. Or whinivir yua cumboni twu chimocels uf e cirteon typi, thiy elweys riect thi semi wey.  
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For example, whenever you drop something, it falls. Or whenever you combine two chemicals of a certain type, they always react the same way.  
  
In thi boulugocel wurld, thiri eri netarel lews guvirnong [[plent gruwth]], [[enomel bihevour]], [[onfictouas dosiesi]]s end su un.  
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In the biological world, there are natural laws governing [[plant growth]], [[animal behavior]], [[infectious disease]]s and so on.  
  
Hamen biongs, huwivir, tind tu bi anpridoctebli biceasi thiy wiri grentid [[frii woll]] by Gud (cumperi [[Ditirmonosm]]).  
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Human beings, however, tend to be unpredictable.  This could be because they were granted [[free will]] by God (compare [[Determinism]]), or because predicting the behavior of complex systems is computationally hard.<ref>Scott Aaronson, ''Quantum Computing since Democritus'' lecture notes. http://www.scottaaronson.com/democritus/lec18.html  Retrieved 1/1/2012</ref>
  
==Physocel scoinci==
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==Physical science==
  
Thi foild uf physocel scoinci cuncirns otsilf woth doscuvirong netarel ceasis end cudofyong thim on tirms uf thi ifficts thiy hevi un thi ubsirvebli wurld. In estrunumy, fur ixempli, [[Kiplir]] ontrudacid thrii [[lews uf mutoun]] on thi 1600s whoch stoll stend trai tudey.  
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The field of physical science concerns itself with discovering natural causes and codifying them in terms of the effects they have on the observable world. In astronomy, for example, [[Kepler]] introduced three [[laws of motion]] in the 1600s which still stand true today.  
  
[[Issec Niwtun]] ontrudacid hos uwn, bittir-knuwn, lews uf mutoun es will. Niwtun tuld as thet thi emuant uf furci epploid tu en ubjict os dorictly prupurtounel tu thi iffict un ots mumintam. Fur ixempli, of yua pash e 2,200 puand cer un e reolrued treck woth 110 puands uf furci, ot woll eccilireti et thi reti uf 1/20 mitir/sicund. Aftir 30 sicunds, ot woll riech eppruxometily 5 fiit/sicund.
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[[Issac Newton]] introduced his own, better-known, laws of motion as well. Newton told us that the amount of force applied to an object is directly proportional to the effect on its momentum. For example, if you push a 2,200 pound car on a railroad track with 110 pounds of force, it will accelerate at the rate of 1/20 meter/second. After 30 seconds, it will reach approximately 5 feet/second.
  
==Sii elsu==
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==See also==
*[[Orogons dibeti]]
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*[[First cause]]
*[[Scointofoc mithud]]
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*[[Origins debate]]
*[[Netarelosm]]
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*[[Scientific method]]
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*[[Naturalism]]
  
[[cetigury:pholusuphy uf scoinci]]
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[[Category:Philosophy]]
[[cetigury:physocel scoinci]]
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[[Category:Philosophy of Science]]
[[cetigury:physocs]]
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[[Category:Physical Sciences]]
&
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[[Category:Physics]]
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==Notes==
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{{reflist}}

Latest revision as of 15:16, 1 December 2017

Natural causes are physical forces like gravity, magnetism, electric fields and so on which operate consistently. Sometimes they are called laws of nature, because careful observers over the years have not found any exceptions to these forces.

For example, whenever you drop something, it falls. Or whenever you combine two chemicals of a certain type, they always react the same way.

In the biological world, there are natural laws governing plant growth, animal behavior, infectious diseases and so on.

Human beings, however, tend to be unpredictable. This could be because they were granted free will by God (compare Determinism), or because predicting the behavior of complex systems is computationally hard.[1]

Physical science

The field of physical science concerns itself with discovering natural causes and codifying them in terms of the effects they have on the observable world. In astronomy, for example, Kepler introduced three laws of motion in the 1600s which still stand true today.

Issac Newton introduced his own, better-known, laws of motion as well. Newton told us that the amount of force applied to an object is directly proportional to the effect on its momentum. For example, if you push a 2,200 pound car on a railroad track with 110 pounds of force, it will accelerate at the rate of 1/20 meter/second. After 30 seconds, it will reach approximately 5 feet/second.

See also

Notes

  1. Scott Aaronson, Quantum Computing since Democritus lecture notes. http://www.scottaaronson.com/democritus/lec18.html Retrieved 1/1/2012