Difference between revisions of "Newspeak"

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(Revised intro - thinking of including some of the famous formulations later (doubleplusgood, etc.))
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'''Newspeak''' was a invented [[language]] mentioned in [[George Orwell]]'s ''[[1984]]'' designed not to express thought as much as to suppress it. Through a process of simplifying the language, what we would call today "dumbing it down", the [[totalitarian]] [[socialist]]s in the novel intended to produce a society of people who spoke without saying anything. The highest compliment to be given to a political orator would be a "doubleplusgood duckspeaker".
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'''Newspeak''' appears in [[George Orwell]]'s ''[[1984]]''. It is a [[language]], designed by the ruling regime [[Ingsoc]] to replace Oldspeak ([[English]]).
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Its purpose is to suppress thought by severely curtailing both the conceptual vocabulary and permissable grammatical structures of Oldspeak. As Orwell describes in the Appendix: "....a thought diverging from the principles of Ingsoc should be literally unthinkable, at least insofar as thought is dependent on words." <ref>p. 312, 1984 - George Orwell, Penguin, 1984</ref>
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It is a terrifying notion, not least for its plausibility and the games we see played with words and meanings by those in power today.
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== See also ==
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* [[Doublethink]]
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* [[Thoughtcrime]]
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* [[Crimestop]]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
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Revision as of 12:36, 2 May 2007

Newspeak appears in George Orwell's 1984. It is a language, designed by the ruling regime Ingsoc to replace Oldspeak (English).

Its purpose is to suppress thought by severely curtailing both the conceptual vocabulary and permissable grammatical structures of Oldspeak. As Orwell describes in the Appendix: "....a thought diverging from the principles of Ingsoc should be literally unthinkable, at least insofar as thought is dependent on words." [1]

It is a terrifying notion, not least for its plausibility and the games we see played with words and meanings by those in power today.

See also

References

  1. p. 312, 1984 - George Orwell, Penguin, 1984