Difference between revisions of "Patrick Henry"

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'''Patrick Henry''' (1736-1799) lived during the [[American Revolution]], and an anti-Federalist who opposed ratification of the [[U.S. Constitution]] afterwards. A radical democrat, he supported combining the executive and the legislative into a single elected body. An [[attorney]], he prevailed in the Parsons' Cause by defending the right of the [[Virginia]] colony to fix the price of the [[tobacco]] to be paid to the clergy in violation of a contrary ruling in [[England]].<ref>http://www.americanrevwar.homestead.com/files/HENRY.HTM</ref>  
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'''Patrick Henry''' (1736-1799) was a Patriot during the [[American Revolution]], and an anti-Federalist who opposed ratification of the [[U.S. Constitution]] afterwards. A radical democrat, he supported combining the executive and the legislative into a single elected body. An [[attorney]], he prevailed in the Parsons' Cause by defending the right of the [[Virginia]] colony to fix the price of the [[tobacco]] to be paid to the clergy in violation of a contrary ruling in [[England]].<ref>http://www.americanrevwar.homestead.com/files/HENRY.HTM</ref>
 
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Of the case, [[Thomas Jefferson|Jefferson]] wrote: ''No man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burdened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer, on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.'' This is thought by many historians to be part of the prinicple of separation between church and state.
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Patrick Henry is best known today for the rousing speech that he gave on March 23, 1775 to the 2nd Virginia Convention at Richmond's St. John's Church:<ref>http://www.amerisearch.net/index.php?date=2004-03-23&view=View</ref>  
 
Patrick Henry is best known today for the rousing speech that he gave on March 23, 1775 to the 2nd Virginia Convention at Richmond's St. John's Church:<ref>http://www.amerisearch.net/index.php?date=2004-03-23&view=View</ref>  

Revision as of 15:39, 8 June 2007

Patrick Henry (1736-1799) was a Patriot during the American Revolution, and an anti-Federalist who opposed ratification of the U.S. Constitution afterwards. A radical democrat, he supported combining the executive and the legislative into a single elected body. An attorney, he prevailed in the Parsons' Cause by defending the right of the Virginia colony to fix the price of the tobacco to be paid to the clergy in violation of a contrary ruling in England.[1]

Patrick Henry is best known today for the rousing speech that he gave on March 23, 1775 to the 2nd Virginia Convention at Richmond's St. John's Church:[2]

I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery ... We have done everything that could be done to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated ... We have prostrated ourselves before the throne ... Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence. ...
There is a just God who presides over the destines of nations ... who will raise up friends to fight our battle for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave ... Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death.

References

  1. http://www.americanrevwar.homestead.com/files/HENRY.HTM
  2. http://www.amerisearch.net/index.php?date=2004-03-23&view=View