Difference between revisions of "Patriot Act"

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The '''Patriot Act''' (formally, the `Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA PATRIOT Act of 2001') was an act passed by the [[congress]] following the 2001 attacks on World Trade Center.  It was passed nearly unanimously by the [[Senate]] 98-1, and 357-66 in the [[House]], with the support of members from both political parties<ref>http://www.lifeandliberty.gov/highlights.htm</ref>. Its purpose is to prevent future devastating terrorist attacks. Despite the cries of liberal activist groups, such as the ACLU, there have not been any verified abuses of any of the provisions of the Patriot Act<ref>http://www.fbi.gov/aboutus/transformation/patriot_act.htm</ref> nor any terrorist incidents causing loss of life on American soil since its passage.  The act allows investigators of suspected terrorists the same tools that have always been available to those who investigate drug trafficking and organized crime.
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The '''USA Patriot Act''' (formally, the '''Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001''') was an act passed by [[Congress]] following the [[September 11, 2001 attacks|2001 terror attacks]] on the World Trade Center.  The act passed nearly unanimously by the [[Senate]] 98-1, and 357-66 in the [[United States House of Representatives|House]], with the support of members from both political parties<ref>http://www.lifeandliberty.gov/highlights.htm</ref>. Its purpose is to assist the federal government in preventing future terrorist attacks by giving investigators of suspected terrorists the same tools that have always been available to those who investigate drug trafficking and organized crime.
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Despite the cries of [[liberal]] and civil [[libertarian]] groups, such as the ACLU, the FBI reports that there have not been any verified abuses of any of the provisions of the Patriot Act<ref>http://www.fbi.gov/aboutus/transformation/patriot_act.htm</ref> nor any terrorist incidents causing loss of life on American soil since its passage.   
  
 
Eight states (Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Maine, Montana and Vermont) and 396 cities and counties (including New York City; Los Angeles; Dallas; Chicago; Eugene, Oregon; Philadelphia; and Cambridge, Massachusetts) have passed resolutions condemning the Act for attacking civil liberties.
 
Eight states (Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Maine, Montana and Vermont) and 396 cities and counties (including New York City; Los Angeles; Dallas; Chicago; Eugene, Oregon; Philadelphia; and Cambridge, Massachusetts) have passed resolutions condemning the Act for attacking civil liberties.
 
On March 9, 2007, a Justice Department audit found that the FBI had "improperly and, in some cases, illegally used the USA Patriot Act to secretly obtain personal information" about United States citizens. [1]
 
 
On June 15, 2007, following an internal audit finding that FBI agents abused a Patriot Act power more than 1000 times, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates ordered the agency to begin turning over thousands of pages of documents related to the agency's national security letters program.[2]
 
 
On April 6, 2004, the American Civil Liberties Union sued the FBI over the USA PATRIOT Act's authority to demand that a business hand over records that may contain private financial or business information that is not pertinent to an ongoing investigation. The specific action in question was the request of the FBI for the account information for users of an Internet service provider.
 
 
Citing possible secrecy provisions of the USA PATRIOT Act, the Department of Justice prevented the ACLU from releasing the text of a countersuit for three weeks. [4] After judicial and congressional oversight, sections of the countersuit that did not violate secrecy rules of the USA PATRIOT Act were released.
 
 
The lawsuit filed by the ACLU was dropped on October 27, 2006. ACLU stated it is withdrawing the lawsuit because of improvements to the law. "While the reauthorized Patriot Act is far from perfect, we succeeded in stemming the damage from some of the Bush administration's most reckless policies," Ann Beeson, associate legal director of the ACLU.
 
 
In June 2005, the United States House of Representatives voted to repeal the Patriot Act provision that allows federal agents to examine people's book-reading habits at public libraries and bookstores as part of terrorism investigations.[5]
 
  
 
== Revisions ==
 
== Revisions ==
  
In the wake of the controversy over the firings of US attorneys by the [[U.S. Justice Department]], Congress moved to strip the Patriot Act of the provision permitting the Attorney General to appoint new US attorneys without the advice and consent of the Senate. The Bush Administration made no objection.
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In the wake of the controversy over the firings of US attorneys by the [[U.S. Justice Department]], Congress moved to strip the Patriot Act of the provision permitting the Attorney General to appoint new US attorneys without the advice and consent of the Senate. The Bush Administration made no objection.{{fact}}
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
<references/>
 
<references/>
 
  
 
==Links==
 
==Links==

Revision as of 16:56, 8 July 2007

Template:Stub The USA Patriot Act (formally, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001) was an act passed by Congress following the 2001 terror attacks on the World Trade Center. The act passed nearly unanimously by the Senate 98-1, and 357-66 in the House, with the support of members from both political parties[1]. Its purpose is to assist the federal government in preventing future terrorist attacks by giving investigators of suspected terrorists the same tools that have always been available to those who investigate drug trafficking and organized crime.

Despite the cries of liberal and civil libertarian groups, such as the ACLU, the FBI reports that there have not been any verified abuses of any of the provisions of the Patriot Act[2] nor any terrorist incidents causing loss of life on American soil since its passage.

Eight states (Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Maine, Montana and Vermont) and 396 cities and counties (including New York City; Los Angeles; Dallas; Chicago; Eugene, Oregon; Philadelphia; and Cambridge, Massachusetts) have passed resolutions condemning the Act for attacking civil liberties.

Revisions

In the wake of the controversy over the firings of US attorneys by the U.S. Justice Department, Congress moved to strip the Patriot Act of the provision permitting the Attorney General to appoint new US attorneys without the advice and consent of the Senate. The Bush Administration made no objection.[Citation Needed]

References

  1. http://www.lifeandliberty.gov/highlights.htm
  2. http://www.fbi.gov/aboutus/transformation/patriot_act.htm

Links