Difference between revisions of "Pharmacist"

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A pharmacist (or a druggist) is a licensed professional who works in a [[pharmacy]] where their responsibilities include: reviewing the prescription, preparing the drug, patient-counseling and various administrative duties.
 
A pharmacist (or a druggist) is a licensed professional who works in a [[pharmacy]] where their responsibilities include: reviewing the prescription, preparing the drug, patient-counseling and various administrative duties.
  
The qualifications to become a pharmacist can vary between different countries.  For example, in [[Canada]], a Bachelor of Pharmacy degree is the minimum requirement of becoming a pharmacist.  There is the option to study for an additional two years to get a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree, but it is not a requirement.<ref>http://www.pharmacists.ca/content/about_cpha/about_pharmacy_in_can/how_to_become/index.cfm</ref>  Conversely, a PharmD degree is a requirement for aspiring pharmacists in the [[United States]].<ref>http://www.uspharmd.com/</ref>
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The qualifications to become a pharmacist can vary between different countries.  For example, in [[Canada]], a Bachelor of Pharmacy degree is the minimum requirement of becoming a pharmacist.  There is the option to study for an additional two years to get a [[Doctor of Pharmacy]] (PharmD) degree, but it is not a requirement.<ref>http://www.pharmacists.ca/content/about_cpha/about_pharmacy_in_can/how_to_become/index.cfm</ref>  Conversely, a PharmD degree is a requirement for aspiring pharmacists in the [[United States]].<ref>http://www.uspharmd.com/</ref>
  
 
=References=
 
=References=

Revision as of 01:39, 15 July 2011

A pharmacist (or a druggist) is a licensed professional who works in a pharmacy where their responsibilities include: reviewing the prescription, preparing the drug, patient-counseling and various administrative duties.

The qualifications to become a pharmacist can vary between different countries. For example, in Canada, a Bachelor of Pharmacy degree is the minimum requirement of becoming a pharmacist. There is the option to study for an additional two years to get a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree, but it is not a requirement.[1] Conversely, a PharmD degree is a requirement for aspiring pharmacists in the United States.[2]

References

  1. http://www.pharmacists.ca/content/about_cpha/about_pharmacy_in_can/how_to_become/index.cfm
  2. http://www.uspharmd.com/