Difference between revisions of "Politics"

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'''Politics''' is the art of governing an administrative entity, such as a city or nation, as well as the methods and beliefs involved in that management. People who share broad political goals often gather into parties to mobilize fundraising and create a unified manifesto, called a party [[platform]]. In a multi-party state, such as the United States, politics can be adversarial but in a productive way.   In a single-party state, such as communist China or certain democracies where the minority party is practically non-existent, politics amounts to a process of rubber-stamping the decisions of a small ruling group.
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'''Politics''' is the art of governing an administrative entity, such as a city or nation, as well as the methods and beliefs involved in that management. People who share broad political goals often gather into parties to mobilize fundraising and create a unified manifesto, called a party [[platform]]. In a multi-party state, such as the United States, politics can be adversarial but in a productive way. In a single-party state, such as communist China or certain democracies where the minority party is practically non-existent, politics amounts to a process of rubber-stamping the decisions of a small ruling group.
  
 
Sometimes the accusation that an opponent is "playing partisan politics" is thrown around as a criticism, but this is actually expected behavior in a multi-party system.
 
Sometimes the accusation that an opponent is "playing partisan politics" is thrown around as a criticism, but this is actually expected behavior in a multi-party system.
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[[Category:Politics]]

Revision as of 08:04, 6 April 2007

Politics is the art of governing an administrative entity, such as a city or nation, as well as the methods and beliefs involved in that management. People who share broad political goals often gather into parties to mobilize fundraising and create a unified manifesto, called a party platform. In a multi-party state, such as the United States, politics can be adversarial but in a productive way. In a single-party state, such as communist China or certain democracies where the minority party is practically non-existent, politics amounts to a process of rubber-stamping the decisions of a small ruling group.

Sometimes the accusation that an opponent is "playing partisan politics" is thrown around as a criticism, but this is actually expected behavior in a multi-party system.