Difference between revisions of "Potential energy"

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'''Potential energy''' is [[energy]] that is stored in an object, such as the energy in a [[roller coaster]] train at the peak of its lift [[hill]].<ref>Wile, Jay L. ''Exploring Creation With Chemistry''. Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. 1998</ref>
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'''Potential energy''' is [[energy]] that is stored in an object. An example is gravitational potential energy such as that of a roller coaster train at the peak of its lift [[hill]].<ref>Wile, Jay L. ''Exploring Creation With Chemistry''. Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. 1998</ref>
  
The formula of potential energy is:
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The formula for gravitational potential energy for two point masses is:
:<math>E_\mathrm {pot} = m \, g \, h</math>
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:<math>V = -\frac{GMm}{r}</math>
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where
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:<math>G</math> is Newton's [[gravitational constant]]
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:<math>M</math> and <math>m</math> are the [[mass (science)|masses]] of the two particles
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:<math>r</math> is their separation
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If one particle moves a radial distance (towards or away) from the other a distance <math>\Delta h</math> and <math>\Delta h \ll r</math>, then the change in potential <math>\Delta E</math> can be approximated by
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:<math>\Delta E = mg \, \Delta h</math>
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where <math>g</math> is the gravitational field strength in the vicinity of the initial and final points.
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 16:05, 23 November 2016

Potential energy is energy that is stored in an object. An example is gravitational potential energy such as that of a roller coaster train at the peak of its lift hill.[1]

The formula for gravitational potential energy for two point masses is:

where

is Newton's gravitational constant
and are the masses of the two particles
is their separation

If one particle moves a radial distance (towards or away) from the other a distance and , then the change in potential can be approximated by

where is the gravitational field strength in the vicinity of the initial and final points.

See also

References

  1. Wile, Jay L. Exploring Creation With Chemistry. Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. 1998