Difference between revisions of "Racial profiling controversy"

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'''Racial profiling''' is the use of race in a "[[profile]]" of a suspected criminal. Wherever police have served a mixed-race population, the race of suspects has always been used, because race (or [[skin color]]) is one of the most prominent characteristic of a person, along with sex and age.
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'''Racial profiling''' is the use of race in [[profiling]] a suspected criminal. Wherever police have served a mixed-race population, the race of suspects has always been used, because race (or [[skin color]]) is one of the most prominent characteristic of a person, along with sex and age.
  
 
The use of race in profiling came under fire when protest groups began to complain that police were making sweeps or traffic stops based mainly on race, and thus discriminating against innocent people. Such practices as stopping all blacks for questioning - when no particular crime was being investigated - came into question.
 
The use of race in profiling came under fire when protest groups began to complain that police were making sweeps or traffic stops based mainly on race, and thus discriminating against innocent people. Such practices as stopping all blacks for questioning - when no particular crime was being investigated - came into question.

Revision as of 20:30, 9 March 2009

Racial profiling is the use of race in profiling a suspected criminal. Wherever police have served a mixed-race population, the race of suspects has always been used, because race (or skin color) is one of the most prominent characteristic of a person, along with sex and age.

The use of race in profiling came under fire when protest groups began to complain that police were making sweeps or traffic stops based mainly on race, and thus discriminating against innocent people. Such practices as stopping all blacks for questioning - when no particular crime was being investigated - came into question.

In reaction, many police forces and even the FBI began to be leery of being accused of stereotyping. The most prominent case in the tragic run-up to 9-11, when the FBI had cause to suspect a flight student. The FBI agent handling the case was told by their supervisor not to seek a warrant, even though the Arabic-looking man only wanted to learn how to steer a Boeing 747 but not do takeoffs or landings.

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